W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-html@w3.org > March 2005

RE: Neutral tags (like meta inside body).

From: Mark Birbeck <mark.birbeck@x-port.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Mar 2005 10:02:44 -0000
Message-ID: <D322EA64-9DF4-4389-829D-26AE86C7B615@S009>
To: "'Jukka K. Korpela'" <jkorpela@cs.tut.fi>
Cc: <www-html@w3.org>

Jukka,

<meta> and <link> are allowed anywhere in XHTML 2.

Regards,

Mark


Mark Birbeck
CEO
x-port.net Ltd.

e: Mark.Birbeck@x-port.net
t: +44 (0) 20 7689 9232
w: http://www.formsPlayer.com/
b: http://internet-apps.blogspot.com/

Download our XForms processor from
http://www.formsPlayer.com/ 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: www-html-request@w3.org 
> [mailto:www-html-request@w3.org] On Behalf Of Jukka K. Korpela
> Sent: 14 March 2005 09:30
> To: www-html@w3.org
> Subject: Re: Neutral tags (like meta inside body).
> 
> 
> On Mon, 14 Mar 2005, Bjoern Hoehrmann wrote:
> 
> > You could use a processing instruction ala
> >
> >   ...
> >   <?meta index="no">
> 
> You mean <?meta index="no"?>, right, to satisfy XML rules for 
> processing instructions?
> 
> If metainformation inside a document's body are treated as 
> something best presented as processing instructions, why 
> would the existing syntax of <meta> elements be justified, 
> then? There's no reason why metadata should always apply to 
> the document as a whole only. The crucial question is what 
> metadata is and how it should be presented. Indexing issues 
> might be debatable in this respect (but you implicitly 
> counted them as metadata by your choice of the name "meta" here :-)).
> 
> The syntax of <meta> elements is not very satisfactory in 
> existing HTML, and might need quite some modifications. But 
> independently of this, is there any good reason to disallow 
> them inside <body>? The obvious semantics would be that the 
> <meta> element relates to the content of its parent element, 
> except when it appears inside a <head> element, in which case 
> it relates to the root element. (On the other hand, the 
> distinction between <head> and <body> might itself be 
> unnecessary and potentially
> misleading.)
> 
> (Of course, <meta> elements with http-equiv attribute relate 
> to the document as a whole by definition. They are a 
> different beast and need consideration of their own.)
> 
> --
> Jukka "Yucca" Korpela, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
> 
> 
> 
> 
Received on Monday, 14 March 2005 10:03:29 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Tuesday, 27 March 2012 18:16:02 GMT