W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-html@w3.org > March 2004

nbsp and typography rules Re: <NOBR> - Returning to the question....

From: Karl Dubost <karl@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 14:26:41 -0500
Message-Id: <56708642-8349-11D8-B9B4-000A95718F82@w3.org>
To: www-html@w3.org
That's an interesting case, which I'm not sure is solvable.

Le 31 mars 2004, à 05:12, <olafBuddenhagen@web.de> a écrit :
> To begin with, &nbsp; isn't really HTML. It is a Unicode character. 
> Why?
> Because it's neither semantical (adding additional meaning to the 
> content), nor a matter of variable styling (pasted over the content by 
> some layouting tool or whatever).

Does the typographic rules of each countries are presentational, 
content oriented or not, etc?
How to deal with them?
Is there a need for a set of rules specific for the Web?

Who should be in charge of that? I18N? HTML? CSS?

&nbsp; <del>wrong</del> poor man usage in French.

	<p>C'est incroyable&nbsp;!</p>

Typographic rules: You have often a “espace fine” between the character 
and the punctuation which is not exactly a true space. The “espace 
fine” is not breakable. It's usually equivalent to the quarter of the 
“cadratin”. The “cadratin” is the width a non-printed character (white 
space usually).

For example, still in French:

char    before              after
;     espace fine      breakable space
!     espace fine      breakable space
«     breakable space  espace fine
»     espace fine      breakable space
etc.

We had discussion in the past on this list about the “quote” element 
and its internationalization. We agreed that the quote character and 
associated space should be the responsibility of the content developer, 
and not to the user agent at the opposite of “q” in HTML 4.01 semantics 
family.

&nbsp; has another usage than typographic rules. If not, why it should 
be implemented more than the previous decision (I'm not taking position 
here).


Received on Wednesday, 31 March 2004 17:24:59 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Tuesday, 18 February 2014 13:20:08 UTC