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Re: a recommendation - Received on Thursday, 18 April 2002 14:01:42 EDT

From: Fastpitch Central - Bill <bill@fastpitchcentral.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Dec 2003 02:00:57 -0500
Message-ID: <000001c3b974$34209000$0200a8c0@wwmcd.com>
To: <www-html@w3.org>
Frank Tobin said:

It's not smart to have the content layer start making up ad-hoc solutions for problems in the code/protocol layer.  Furthermore, how would a client even receive the page that has this information in it, if it's not addressable with an A record?  Catch 22.

Not to be mean, but perhaps it's not smart to put too much trust in any layer.  Witness the problems that SPAM presents - many of which go directly back to inadequate design in the early days.  But I digress.

I for one could search around and type the "dotnum" into the client browser to get the website started.  And, if my <base ...> tag modification were in place I could then surf the site without any problems.

As I recall an attack was made on DNS servers within the last couple years.  Although the attacks apparently failed, nevertheless perhaps it should be considered a warning of what could happen.  

If the <base . . .> tag suggestion I made was accepted then folks would at least have an option.  Businesses and government agencies could have their dotnum posted in emergencies.  They could give out the dotnum whenever appropriate in those, hopefully rare, emergency situations.  

I guess this idea occurred close to two years ago.  I just ran across my remark and Frank Tobin's response in an unrelated Google search.  I still see my suggestion as perfectly valid and very useful in emergency situations.  Besides, the Dept. of Homeland Security would probably see merit and provide funding for someone.
Received on Wednesday, 3 December 2003 03:16:46 GMT

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