W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-html@w3.org > June 1999

RE: avoid visitors viewing inside pages

From: Nicolas Lesbats <nlesbats@etu.utc.fr>
Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 11:42:36 +0200 (MET DST)
To: Nathan Zaetta <nzaetta@brw.fairfax.com.au>
cc: Aditya Hermawan <aditya@sby.globalinfo.net>, W3HTML <www-html@w3.org>
Message-ID: <Pine.OSF.4.02.9906290943130.28151-100000@vega.utc.fr>
On Tue, 29 Jun 1999, Nathan Zaetta wrote:

| > You can add to each page of the site a
| >
| >  <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0, http://.....index.html">
|
| Um, this solution also means that nobody can ever get to any other page, as
| they will always be redirected back to the index

In fact, this is because it *is not* a solution ! Just a part of a
potential one...

I had a similar problem (which is not solved). My site was built around a
index.html file, which was a frames structure. To simplify, a 'left' frame
(for a general menu), and a 'main' frame (for contents).

I had, for instance, an article.html file, which was accessable from the
index.html frameset. But it was too able to open it directly from a search
engine.

What I wanted to do yet was to 'reincorporate' (directly translated from
french, I've some doubts about it) = 'integrate' = 'introduce' this file
_in_ the index.html frameset.

Let's take a possible processing, which will be clearer I hope.

 * The user opens the article.html file, out of any frameset. An
instruction in the article.html file tells the User Agent to re-open it in
the index.html frameset, in the "main" frame.

For example (totally invented XHTML) :

	<link rev="frameset"	{ or role="frameset" }
	 href="index.html?main=article.html" target="_parent"
	 xml:link="simple" actuate="auto" show="remplaced"
	/>

What is important here is the possibility to specify the content of each
frame in the URL of a frameset file. What do you think about the
syntax above :

http://www.foo.com/frameset.html?frame_name=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.foo.com%2Fframe_content.html

 * When the UA parses index.html, for example :

	<frameset>
	 <frame name="left" href="left_frame.html" />
	 <frame name="main" href="main_frame.html" />
	</frameset>

it replaces the hyperreference of the main frame by the processing
instruction included in the URL, here http://www.foo.com/article.html

[Of course, it doesn't solve entirely the problem because the use of the
'actuate="auto"' attribute in the <link> element can be processed like a
perpetual refresh of the page, though the 'auto' value still is ambiguous.
It would be necessary to correct that too.

Furthermore, it would be necessary to refer to the active page directly,
without name it, for instance with a

	href="index.html?main=" origin="this"
or
	href="index.html" frame="main" frame_href="this" ]

Then, a solution for one of the Aditya's problems is to use an inline
frame in index.html (<iframe> element) to display any other page.

I think javascript can be used, but incompatibiliy between
some browsers are very dissuading.

The more workable solution I have found is to never use frames anymore...
Furthermore, frame elements are deprecated according to some W3C working
groups (but I don't agree with it).

Since this list is designated to correct problems, have anyone any
proposal about it ?

			Nicolas

-- 
Nicolas Lesbats - nlesbats@etu.utc.fr
85 r. Carnot 60200 Compiegne - France
 06 86 800 908

Plaider <http://wwwassos.utc.fr/~plaider/>

3:-)
Received on Tuesday, 29 June 1999 05:42:51 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Tuesday, 27 March 2012 18:15:39 GMT