W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-html@w3.org > January 1999

HTML4, CSS2, and XML: Accelerate Conformance!

From: Inanis Brooke <alatus@earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 8 Jan 1999 01:41:16 -0500 (EST)
Message-ID: <002301be3ad1$fb3e69e0$3230b3d1@alatus>
To: "w3c html" <www-html@w3.org>
Okay, I changed the subject of this thread now... I've had enough reminders
of the fact that I can't code (except of course, HTML and CSS.)    :)    (or
perhaps >:| is more apropriate...)

This probably sounds stupid, but instead of having corporations cough up
source code, or have the companies run benchmarks on their own software,
what if someone at the w3c made the "mother-of-all-html4-and-css-pages"
which use every single part of the recommendation at least once. It
obviously wouldn't work very well for official testing, but it could be a
countermeasure to cheating, especially if images (probably jpeg, since
quality isn't as necessary as low bandwidth,) showing what the element is
*supposed* to look like across from that element were accessible by the
public, and mirrored worldwide. This way, concerned 'net users could test
the credibility of the procedures.

Also, I'm sure it's up to the w3c to start any conformance testing program,
but I'm basically asking, how do we "catch their attention?" How do we
submit the idea officially, if need be? (Does it need be?) I'm a newbie
here, but I have a lot of ideas, and I'm trying to learn from what I'm
seeing here.

Lastly, does anyone here know the status of Amaya? The news on the Amaya
page seems a bit outdated. I'm eager to see a win32 version as soon as
possible!

Call me curious, but are there any official w3c members who officially
"monitor" this list? Not to sound paranoid, but to ask if they know what
we're talking about already.
Received on Friday, 8 January 1999 03:16:00 GMT

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