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RE: <div align=justify> ?

From: Gordon Worley <redbird@orlando.crosswinds.net>
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 1999 22:59:09 -0500 (EST)
Message-Id: <l03130301000332e454a0@[10.50.227.10]>
To: www-html <www-html@w3.org>
Braden wrote:

>> because the DIV element was designed for use with CSS.
>
>I dunno about that. A generic division element has utility beyond
>application of style sheets. DIV and SPAN are elements of "last resort". You
>should probably only use them when the logical implications of more
>descriptive elements do not apply to your content (regardless of whether or
>not you're using style sheets).

	It appears from the messages I have received today that I phrased
this incorrectly.  My trips to the actual specifications are much to far
and inbetween.  I was refering more so to the actual use of the DIV tag.
In practice I know many Web developers who use DIV only becuase of its
flexability in conjunction with CSS.  Also, I code in the most abstract way
possible, creating well structured documents that downgrade well enough
that they are readable in older browsers, though lacking much eye candy.
I'm a programmer, not a graphics designer.  As far as I am concerned, HTML
is just another programming language.

>>  Since
>> CSS would be doing all of the formating, why should the DIV element be
>> given more attributes to become redundent.
>
>Probably for consistency.
>

	I take this back since I now know when DIV was implemented.  I
simply lacked much need for it [DIV] before CSS.

>>  Text alignment tags have been
>> deprecated from HTML to seperate between structure and
>> appearence.
>
>Yes; that doesn't mean they don't exist.
>
>> 	The redundency would  make your document all the harder to read.
>
>Just because it's there doesn't mean you have to use it.

	True enough.  But I'm a programmer, and want to be able to read
everyones' code easily.

>
>> The beauty of CSS is that you only have to define the appearence of
>> somellthing once, so that your HTML represents the structure of your
>> document, making it easier to read.
>
>Indeed, but until the state of CSS support improves, many authors are
>content to satisfy themselves with the less-powerful (and thus more likely
>to be adequately implemented) mechanisms in HTML alone.

	Alas, the delima I choose ignor (although I realize some of you
don't have that option B-(.

________________________________________
Red Bird Island Productions
Gordon Worley
http://www.crosswinds.net/orlando/~redbird/
mailto:redbird@orlando.crosswinds.net
Received on Monday, 4 January 1999 22:57:31 GMT

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