Re: Euro currency sign

=?iso-8859-1?Q?Martin_J=2E_D=FCrst?= (mduerst@ifi.unizh.ch)
Mon, 20 Oct 1997 18:16:10 +0100 (MET)


Date: Mon, 20 Oct 1997 18:16:10 +0100 (MET)
From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Martin_J=2E_D=FCrst?= <mduerst@ifi.unizh.ch>
To: Carrasco Benitez Manuel <manuel.carrasco@emea.eudra.org>
cc: "'Rob'" <wlkngowl@unix.asb.com>, www-international@w3.org, www-html@w3.org
In-Reply-To: <5DFB753C1329D1119DEC00805F15C342D8D2@WS015>
Message-ID: <Pine.SUN.3.96.971020181044.245p-100000@enoshima.ifi.unizh.ch>
Subject: RE: Euro currency sign

On Fri, 17 Oct 1997, Carrasco Benitez Manuel wrote:

> > I just meant converting the form, say "1,000.12" to "1.000,12" or 
> > something that would use the appropriate currency symbol: perhaps
> > <span lang="en-US">&currenvy;</span> but not actual monetary
> > conversions. Yuck!
> > 
> > 
> > [Carrasco Benitez Manuel]  
> > A very valid point, but 
> > 
> >  - In some countries it is  $1,000.12
> >  - In others it is written $1.000,12
> > 
> > I assume that the something similiar would happen for the euro;
> > i.e., this type of local is not dependant on the currency.

The assumption is currently that the formatting will depend on
the language, i.e. if you will have
	<span lang="en-US">$1,000.12</span>
and
	<span lang="de">$1 000,12</span>
or so, and it's the server's responsibility to send these things
out correctly. This gives problems because for cases where
conventions differ depending on sublanguages, the reader may not
be aware of the sublanguage in effect (e.g. US and British dates),
or the reader of a foreign language document may forget that this
language also uses different conventions. So for dates on the web,
always use something like February 3, 2004. Things like 02/03/04
are highly ambiguous!


Regards,	Martin.