Re: Web vs. paper (was Re: implementation of FIRST-LETTER - possible problem)

Peter Flynn (pflynn@imbolc.ucc.ie)
02 Oct 1997 01:12:03 +0100


Date: 02 Oct 1997 01:12:03 +0100
From: Peter Flynn <pflynn@imbolc.ucc.ie>
In-reply-to: <3.0.3.32.19970930153722.006918f4@smtp.idt.net> (message from
To: jptxs@idt.net
Cc: walter@natural-innovations.com, www-html@w3.org
Message-id: <199710020012.BAA29091@imbolc.ucc.ie>
Subject: Re: Web vs. paper (was Re: implementation of FIRST-LETTER -   possible  problem)

   could you possibly explain this to my boss?  she's been doing our
   organization's *newsletters* for 5 years :-)

Show her http://www.ucc.ie/doc/www/markup.html

Ask her:

   1. how to search all past newsletters for references to a topic
      and return just the article in which the topic was mentioned?

   2. what will become of the organization's information base when the
      manufacturer of your current product technology changes course
      or goes out of business?

   3. what she would do if the IRS lawyers or the FBI wanted proof
      that she had or had not published something in one of the
      newsletters, and how she could identify it?

   4. if she is aware that (a) possibly 25% of the organization's
      market may not be able to read the Web copy of the newsletter,
      and (b) unless it adheres to some form of HTML, it may be only
      half readable by the very large blind contingent using voice
      boxes?

I am taking the liberty of assuming (from unhappy experiences)
that it's been exported from a non-HTML system and is therefore not so
much HTML as a random assemblage of tag-like objects masquerading as
HTML.

But if the material in the newsletters has a very short half-life,
then it may simply not be worth the effort of doing a durable job on
them for the sake of the few readers they will have. But this is
conjecture: I'd have to see a copy to make a real judgment.

///Peter