Re: PROPOSAL, Re: New HTML 3.2 specification

Paul Fidler (praf1@cam.ac.uk)
Mon, 13 May 1996 18:17:21 +0100 (BST)


Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 18:17:21 +0100 (BST)
From: Paul Fidler <praf1@cam.ac.uk>
To: Warren Steel <mudws@mail.olemiss.edu>
Cc: www-html@w3.org, mudws@sunset.backbone.olemiss.edu
Subject: Re: PROPOSAL, Re: New HTML 3.2 specification
In-Reply-To: <199605131634.LAA12647@sunset.backbone.olemiss.edu>
Message-Id: <Pine.HPP.3.91.960513175949.21271A-100000@punch.eng.cam.ac.uk>

On Mon, 13 May 1996, Warren Steel wrote:

>                  character-level markup
> 
>    While the 3.0 draft presented logical text markup before
> physical, the 3.2 summary has the reverse order.  This should
> be restored, along with realistic warnings about reliability
> over the Web.  While <STRIKE> may legitimately replace <S>,
> authors still frequently request underline <U>, and often
> inquire about <INS> and <DEL>.  
> 
>    <FONT> should be entirely relegated to style sheets, maybe 
> with <FONT SIZE="+1"> and <FONT SIZE="-1"> allowed as synonyms 
> for <BIG> and <SMALL>, for backward compatibility.  As currently
> implemented, the existing <FONT> element is a positive hindrance
> to communication over the World Wide Web, as many have pointed
> out.

It would also be nice to keep some of the speech-browser friendly 
features of HTML 3.0 character level mark-up such as <ABBREV> and 
<ACRONYM>.

These tags have the advantage that they do not need to be supported
or implemented by the headline grabbing comercial browsers, whilst
being useful for giving speech bowsers hints on how to pronounce
certain phrases. (eg. 'The <Acronym>UN</Acronym> Security Council')

Could these tags be retained in an 'official' DTD, if only so that those 
that took the trouble to include them wouldn't be rewarded with 
'unexpected <ABBREV> tag at line xyz', and also to encourage others to 
use them? 

Paul Fidler
-- 
Cambridge University Engineering Department
Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ