Re: What's wrong with <FONT>

Mike Meyer (mwm@contessa.phone.net)
Mon, 13 May 1996 07:54:31 PST


Subject:  Re: What's wrong with <FONT>
In-Reply-To: <199605130416.XAA23906@predator.urbana.mcd.mot.com>
From: mwm@contessa.phone.net (Mike Meyer)
Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 07:54:31 PST
Message-Id: <19960513.7599660.7544@contessa.phone.net>
To: www-html@w3.org

> From: preece@predator.urbana.mcd.mot.com (Scott E. Preece)
>     From: mwm@contessa.phone.net (Mike Meyer)
> As I say, I agree that most authors should have help, I have to disagree
> with the implied notion that one good stylesheet fits all pages.
> Indeed, as I said, good typography has to follow from the material
> it conveys. 

That's true - one good stylesheet won't fit all pages. However, one
readable stylesheet will lead to all pages being easy to read, which
will allow for extended periods reading documents from the web without
needing asperin afterwards. That would be an improvement over the web
as it is seen through most browsers today.

> So while you can almost certainly do better than the
> defaults, if you always use your preferred formatting, you will be the
> loser when the material has been well designed.

That's obvious - just as it is with colors. However, the few such
losses are more than made up for by losing the pages that are
otherwise just plain unreadable. That the vast majority lie somewhere
between there and a good fixed style means that a single style sheet
is a definite win if you're planning on reading the web for an
extended period.

At some point, this should change. I do look forward to that day, and
hope it arrives in my lifetime.

	<mike