"KEY SPECIFICATIONS OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB" DOCUMENTED IN SECOND ISSUE OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB JOURNAL

Daniel W. Connolly (connolly@beach.w3.org)
Wed, 01 May 1996 14:59:43 -0400


Message-Id: <m0uEh7o-0002TqC@beach.w3.org>
To: html-wg@w3.org, www-talk@w3.org, www-html@w3.org
Subject: "KEY SPECIFICATIONS OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB"  DOCUMENTED IN SECOND ISSUE OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB JOURNAL
Date: Wed, 01 May 1996 14:59:43 -0400
From: "Daniel W. Connolly" <connolly@beach.w3.org>


The HTML, HTTP, and URL specs (such as they are) are finally
in print...

See also:

http://www.w3.org/pub/WWW/Journal/

> KEY SPECIFICATIONS OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB DOCUMENTED IN SECOND ISSUE OF
> 		    THE WORLD WIDE WEB JOURNAL
> 
> SEBASTOPOL, CA--The second issue of the World Wide Web Journal provides
> Webmasters, application programmers, and technical managers with a
> single reference that contains the key specifications of the World Wide
> Web. A publication of the World Wide Web Consortium, whose members
> include software vendors, information publishers, and other
> organizations concerned with the development and use of Web technology,
> the World Wide Web Journal: Volume 1, Issue 2: Key Specifications of
> the World Wide Web describes the core design of the Web's open
> architecture.
> 
> >From the very beginning of the Web at CERN, the specifications that
> described how the Web works were drafted by Tim Berners-Lee and made
> available online.  Since then, these documents have been drafted as
> RFCs (Request For Comment) to conform with standardization process
> established by the group that oversees the development of Internet
> standards, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Today, the World
> Wide Web Consortium, which is also developing new specifications,
> maintains the repository of these documents online. With the
> publication of this issue of the World Wide Web Journal, the complete
> collection of these important documents is available in print for the
> first time.
> 
> The specifications cover the basic architecture of the WWW, as well as
> newly developing features. Its most basic specifications are:
>      > HTTP, the Hypertext Transfer Protocol, defines how content is
> conveyed across the Web (HTTP 1.0 and 1.1).
>      > URLs, or Uniform Resource Locators, are the addressing mechanism
> for the Web (Internet RFCs 1630, 1736, 1738, and 1808).
>      > HTML, the Hypertext Markup Language, is the lingua franca of the
> Web (HTML 1.0 and 2.0, RFCs 1866 and 1867).
> 
> New specifications likely to impact the development of the Web are
> also included:
>      > PNG, a newly developed graphics format created specifically
> for the Web.
>      > PICS, or Platform for Internet Content Selection, creates the
> infrastructure for content rating and labeling services.
>      > PEP is an extension mechanism for HTTP intended to allow HTTP
> agents to interoperate with unknown protocol extensions and to
> negotiate protocol extensions.
>      > HTML tables has the ability to group table rows into sections,
> plus it can specify cell alignment compactly for sets of cells
> according to context.
> 
> The first issue of the World Wide Web Journal, released in January
> 1996, contains the proceedings of the Fourth International World Wide
> Web Conference, held in December 1995 in Boston, Massachusetts. It
> includes 57 refereed technical papers, as well as the two best papers
> from regional conferences.
> 
> WORLD WIDE WEB CONSORTIUM
> 
> The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), led by Tim Berners-Lee, the
> original visionary for the Web, spearheads standards research and
> development for the Web. Over 100 member organizations participate in
> the painstaking work of keeping open access to Web information.
> 
> O'REILLY & ASSOCIATES
> 
> O'Reilly & Associates is recognized worldwide for its definitive books
> on the Internet and UNIX, and more recently for its development of
> online content and software. O'Reilly developed the Global Network
> Navigator (GNN), a pioneering web-based publication which it sold to
> America Online in June 1995. O'Reilly is a major developer of Win32
> software for the Internet. The company's software products include
> WebSite (Web server software for Windows 95 and Windows NT), and
> WebBoard ( Web conferencing system).
> 
> Working closely with developers of new technologies, O'Reilly's editors
> are "computer people" who use the software they write about. The
> company's planning and review cycles link together authors, software
> developers, computer vendors, and technical experts throughout the
> industry in a creative collaboration that mirrors the strengths of the
> "open systems" philosophy itself.
> 
> 			      # # #
> 
> World Wide Web Journal: Volume 1, Issue 2
> Key Specifications of the World Wide Web
> A publication of O'Reilly & Associates and the World Wide Web
>      Consortium (W3C)
> Spring 1996
> 356 pages, ISBN: 1-56592-190-9, $24.95