Re: Frames - does anyone like them?

Paul Prescod (papresco@calum.csclub.uwaterloo.ca)
Wed, 21 Aug 1996 17:06:09 -0400


Message-Id: <1.5.4.32.19960821210609.00933a78@csclub.uwaterloo.ca>
Date: Wed, 21 Aug 1996 17:06:09 -0400
To: fepotts@fepco.com (F. E. Potts), www-html@w3.org
From: Paul Prescod <papresco@calum.csclub.uwaterloo.ca>
Subject: Re: Frames - does anyone like them?

At 11:11 PM 8/20/96 -0600, F. E. Potts wrote:
>Let me provide an example.  This example is an award-winning book that
>has been converted into HTML and placed on the web, complete with
>illustrations.  The body of the work is in one space (not frame), and
>that body of work has two interfaces for the Table of Contents: 1), a
>normal "Home Page" style TOC; and 2), a frame version.  Here are the
>URLs, and you can compare ease of use to determine which "front-end" is
>the most successful:
>
>	http://www.fepco.com/bf.frame.html       (frame version)
>	http://www.fepco.com/Bush_Flying.html    (regular version)

The real problem is that human beings should not be generating tables of
contents by hand, and they should not be encoding them in the same language
that they encode their documents in. "Site maps", "tables of contents", and
even "indexes" are presentational aspects of documents or hyperdocuments
that should be generated by the computer according to the needs of the
client. Panorama does this quite well through its "navigators" feature.

 Paul Prescod