Re: Suppress scroll bars - an idea

Mike Batchelor (mikebat@clark.net)
Mon, 3 Jul 1995 08:25:56 -0400 (EDT)


From: Mike Batchelor <mikebat@clark.net>
Message-Id: <199507031225.IAA20403@clark.net>
Subject: Re: Suppress scroll bars - an idea
To: www-html@www10.w3.org
Date: Mon, 3 Jul 1995 08:25:56 -0400 (EDT)
In-Reply-To: <B8EB656D75@forest.estate.warwick.ac.uk> from "Chris Tilbury" at Jul 3, 95 01:06:34 pm

Chris Tilbury once wrote...
> 
> I don't think you've misunderstood the style tag; it certainly is a 
> more appropriate place for something like this than the actual 
> document itself. However, something like this, which is so utterly 
> browser dependent, isn't really anything to do with the "style" of the 
> document, more to do with the "style" of the browser.
> 
> > All I was suggesting was a way for an author to suggest to the browser
> > that it should paginate the document, rather than scroll it, if the
> > document was too long to fit on a single screen.
> 
> I'd suggest that prompting the author of (insert your favourite 
> browser here) to include an option to remove the scrollbar and to 
> implement some form of "Page" metaphor instead, for navigation 
> purposes, would be a better approach. (If they want other examples, 
> tell them to get Softquad Panorama Free, and implement a <H*>
> based navigator pane like that :-).

Have I missed something again?

Isn't it a feature of the <style> tag, and cascading style sheets, that
the user of the browser can have his/her own local style sheet, and that
the cascading style sheets interact with each other to produce a final
style that is a combination of user and author presentation preferences?

If so, then a browser that implemented style sheets would have the option
to turn scroll bars on/off, if such a style attribute was part of the
proposed <style> tags and sheets.  The user would just turn them off or on
in his/her personal style sheet.  Q.E.D. :) The browser-specific feature
is whether to allow the author to change that particular style element.

My point is, that to page or to scroll seems to me to be a matter of
presentation.

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