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Re: relevant and required

From: <AndrewWatt2001@aol.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Oct 2001 05:51:40 EST
Message-ID: <159.32f2784.290e8ebc@aol.com>
To: www-forms@w3.org, xforms@yahoogroups.com
In a message dated 29/10/01 10:32:38 GMT Standard Time, 
vaudrodr@students.hevs.ch writes:


> I don't understand the difference between "... relevant=false required=true 
> ..." and "... relevant=false required=false ..." specified in the last WD.
> The difference specified in the WD is that, in the first case, "the XForms 
> User Interface may indicate that should the form control become relevant, a 
> value would be required". I don't know why.
>  
> Rodrigue Vaudan
> 

Rodrigue,

I think your question is a good one. Conceptually, the difference between the 
two combinations of attributes is, I hope, clear.

The difficulty, I think, arises from the comment, "The XForms User Interface 
may indicate that should the form control become relevant, a value would be 
required.". How, even if it were sensible, can you indicate that a *hidden* 
form control might become required if it were to be made relevant by some 
user action? Even if you can, in what circumstances would it be relevant to 
indicate such a thing?

I think that the attempt, using the sentence "The XForms User Interface may 
indicate that should the form control become relevant, a value would be 
required." to make the entries in the lower row of the table different from 
each other is a mistake, arising from the perceived need to differentiate the 
options in a table.

It is simpler, in my view, that we accept that a non-relevant form control is 
hidden, whether or not it is "required". The difference in concept need not 
be presented visually, as far as I can see.

My conclusion? The sentence in the table isn't "relevant". Deletion is 
"required". :)

Andrew Watt
Received on Monday, 29 October 2001 05:53:13 GMT

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