FW: Free Speech or Harassment? A talk on the Internet and privacy issues

From: Rebecca Bliquez (rbliquez@u.washington.edu)
Date: Fri, May 04 2001

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    From: "Rebecca Bliquez" <rbliquez@u.washington.edu>
    To: <rbliquez@u.washington.edu>
    Date: Fri, 4 May 2001 16:02:25 -0700
    Message-ID: <DAECIPGAKEGKPPCNGNHHCEGDCGAA.rbliquez@u.washington.edu>
    Subject: FW: Free Speech or Harassment?  A talk on the Internet and privacy issues
    
    
    Please post this lecture info. to your events calendar and/or email
    distribution lists.
    
    Thank you for your help!
    
    -----Original Message-----
    From: Rebecca Bliquez [mailto:rbliquez@u.washington.edu]
    Sent: Friday, May 04, 2001 3:26 PM
    To: Condhall@U. Washington. Edu
    Subject: FW: Free Speech or Harassment? A talk on the Internet and
    privacy issues
    
    
    
    
    How far does the First Amendment protect the posting of personal
    information on the Internet? Come find out this Wednesday:
    
    "FREE SPEECH OR HARASSMENT?  PRIVACY IN THE INFORMATION AGE"
    
    May 9, 2001, 4:00 pm
    Condon Hall 129
    
    Guest speaker Elena Garella, a local attorney, will be discussing the issues
    surrounding privacy and free speech on the Internet.  Ms. Garella is
    currently representing the defendant, William Sheehan, in the City of
    Kirkland vs. Sheehan case, which revolves around these subjects.
    
    More on the case below:
    
    
    WWW.JUSTICEFILES.ORG publishes the names, ranks, home addresses, telephone
    numbers and social security numbers of officers in local police forces,
    particularly the City of Kirkland.  Now several of those officers and the
    City seek to enjoin publication of some of this material.  The plaintiffs
    assert that even though the information is available through government
    and commercial sources, its republication on the net is an invasion of
    privacy.
    
    This is the latest in a series of actions that attempt to limit speech on
    the web by claiming tort damages.  The suits note that the Internet is
    different from traditional First Amendment fora such as newspapers and
    pamphlets.  The Internet enables a much wider audience to find specific
    information and access vast databases.  The information can be accessed
    almost instantaneously and usually for free.
    
    Should the courts reexamine privacy law in light of the power of the
    Internet?  Or are traditional expectations of privacy simply outdated in
    the information age?
    
    For more information on this lecture please call 685-2636 or email
    lct@u.washington.edu