W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > wai-eo-editors@w3.org > April 2011

Re: [wbs] response to 'EOWG Review: How People with Disabilities Use the Web - March 2011 Draft'

From: Shadi Abou-Zahra <shadi@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 06 Apr 2011 13:44:19 +0200
Message-ID: <4D9C5213.3070203@w3.org>
To: dboudreau@webconforme.com
CC: wai-eo-editors@w3.org
Hi Denis,

Thank you for your responses. Just some quick initial comments below:


On 6.4.2011 11:30, WBS Mailer on behalf of dboudreau@webconforme.com wrote:
>
> The following answers have been successfully submitted to 'EOWG Review: How
> People with Disabilities Use the Web - March 2011 Draft' (Education and
> Outreach Working Group) for Denis Boudreau.
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
> Support for publishing How People with Disabilities Use the Web as a
> Public Draft
> ----
>
>
>
>
>   * ( ) I accept publishing this version as a Public Draft, as it is
>   * (x) I accept publishing this version as a Public Draft; however, I
> suggest the changes below, for editors' discretion
>   * ( ) I accept publishing this version as a Public Draft only with the
> changes below
>   * ( ) I do not accept publishing this version as a Public Draft, because
> of the comments below
>   * ( ) I abstain (not vote)
>
>
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
> Review of Overview page
> ----
> Please provide your comments on the Overview page:
>
> Comments (or a URI pointing to your comments):
> Nothing to comment.
>
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
> Review of Stories of Web Users page
> ----
> Please provide your comments on Stories of Web Users page:
>
> Comments (or a URI pointing to your comments):
> Mr Yunus: There is nothing related to his mild short-term memory loss
> disability. Should we add on related-browsing problems for him, or just
> drop the mild short-term memory loss problem altogether?

I agree that the short-term memory loss (or actually limitations) can be 
better illustrated in the story. I'd like to bring this to EOWG for 
further exploration of the idea.


> Ms. Kaseem: Most people don't know what being legally blind means.
> Therefore, it might be confusing for people to read that she can see small
> portions of the screen as a blind person. I would suggest changing "she is
> deaf and recently became legally blind too" by "she is deaf and recently
> lost most of her sight" (or something like that) instead.

The term "legally blind" is further qualified with "but she can see 
small portions of a screen". This was intended to help people learn this 
new term, rather than to avoid it altogether.

I'd like to bring this to EOWG for further discussion too.


> It also seems
> unlikely yto me that she would be using a braille display if she only
> recently became legally blind, as braille is not something one learns
> overnight. I have yet to see someone who uses screen magnification software
> also use a braille keyboard. In order to make this scenario more plausible,
> I'd suggest turning this around by saying she has had really poor sight
> from birth and has recently become deaf.

I actually know the real Ms. Kaseem but that's another story... ;)

Again, the use of Braille is qualified with "which she reads slowly" but 
I agree that it could be further elaborated. Also your suggestion may be 
worth considering as an alternative.

Let's discuss in EOWG...


> ---------------------------------
> Review of Diversity of Web Users page
> ----
> Please provide comments on the Diversity of Web Users page:
> Comments (or a URI pointing to your comments):
> » Auditory
> »» More about auditory disabilities
>
> Change: "However, it is important to remember that not all people with
> auditory disabilities know sign language" to "However, it is important to
> remember that most people with auditory disabilities do not know sign
> language."

This is a more sensitive issue that we had quite a bit of discussion on. 
The problem is that saying "most people with auditory disabilities do 
not know sign language" reinforces the unfortunate myth that sign 
language is quantitatively less used and therefore less important. We 
specifically wanted to stay neutral with respect to quantities but to 
still convey the fundamental message.

Let me know if you are not convinced and want further discussion.


> » Physical
> »» More about physical disabilities
>
> Question: "Quadriplegia (sometimes called "tetraplegia")". Isn't
> quadraplegia having both arms and legs paralyzed, while tetraplegia is
> paralyzation form arms, legs and head?

My dictionaries say that "Tetraplegia" is Latin-English (more used in 
Europe) while "Quadraplegia" is Roman-English. Please let me know if you 
have other references on this but I'm pretty sure.


> ---------------------------------
> Review of Ways People Use the Web page
> ----
> (Note that this page title might change after EOWG discussion on 1 April
> or later.)
> Please provide comments on the Ways People Use the Web page:
> Comments (or a URI pointing to your comments):
> » Presentation - distinguishing and understanding
> »» Examples of content presentations
> »»» Sign language
>
> Change: "Not all people who have auditory disabilities or who are deaf
> know sign language." to "Most people who have auditory disabilities do not
> know sign language. People who are deaf are more likely to know sign
> language."

Same as above.


> ---------------------------------
> Review of Web Accessibility Principles page
> ----
> Please provide comments on the Web Accessibility Principles page:
> Comments (or a URI pointing to your comments):
> Nothing to comment, besides that this is the most comprehensive
> interpretation of the WCAG 2.0 guidelines I've seen to date. Awesome job!

Actually it is more than WCAG alone but thank you for the note.


Best,
   Shadi


> These answers were last modified on 6 April 2011 at 09:29:37 U.T.C.
> by Denis Boudreau
>
> Answers to this questionnaire can be set and changed at
> http://www.w3.org/2002/09/wbs/35532/HPWDUW-2011draft/ until 2011-04-06.
>
>   Regards,
>
>   The Automatic WBS Mailer
>
>

-- 
Shadi Abou-Zahra - http://www.w3.org/People/shadi/ |
   WAI International Program Office Activity Lead   |
  W3C Evaluation & Repair Tools Working Group Chair |
Received on Wednesday, 6 April 2011 11:44:46 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Wednesday, 6 April 2011 11:44:46 GMT