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Comments on UAAG 2.0 Public Draft

From: Richards, Jan <jrichards@ocadu.ca>
Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2013 21:14:29 +0000
To: UAWG list <w3c-wai-ua@w3.org>
CC: "Cheetham, Anastasia" <acheetham@ocadu.ca>
Message-ID: <0B1EB1C972BCB740B522ACBCD5F48DEB6BEBC8F6@ocadmail-maildb.ocad.ca>
Hi all,



A colleague, Anastasia Cheetham, and I took a pretty comprehensive look at UAAG 2.0 today for the public call for comments (http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2013AprJun/0066.html), though we used the XLS that had Greg prepared (http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2013AprJun/0086.html).



Anastasia is a web developer with lots of accessibility experience. In particular, we were looking at the document through the lens of video players since Anastasia worked on the Fluid Video Player demo (http://build.fluidproject.org/videoPlayer/videoPlayer/demos/Mammals.html). Our comments are in the table below.


1.1.1 Render Alternative Content: For any content element, the user can choose to render any types of recognized alternative content that are present. (Level A)

JR: Is the phrase "For any content element " necessary? ...BTW: did the group ever look at this proposal (of mine)?: http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/2011AprJun/0086.html

1.1.2 Replace Non-Text Content: The user can have all recognized non-text content replaced by alternative content, placeholders, or both. (Level A)

AC: Seems kind of extreme at Level A that the user should have the option to view captions with the video not displayed at all.

1.1.3 Configurable Alternative Content Defaults: For each type of non-text content, the user can specify a type of alternative content that, if present, will be rendered by default. (Level AA)

1.1.4 Display of Alternative Content for Time-Based Media: For recognized on-screen alternative content for time-based media (e.g. captions, sign language video), the following are all true: (Level AA) (a) Don't obscure primary media: The user can specify that displaying time-based media alternatives doesn't obscure the primary time-based media; and (b) Don't obscure controls: The user can specify that the displaying time-based media alternatives doesn't obscure recognized controls for the primary time-based media; and (c) Use configurable text: The user can configure recognized text within time-based media alternatives (e.g. captions) in conformance with 1.4.1.

AC: (a) seems like a lot at AA, especially since captions typically overlay the lower portion of the video. Others make sense.

1.1.5 Default Rendering of Alternative Content (Enhanced): For each type of non-text content, the user can specify the cascade order in which to render different types of alternative content when preferred types are not present. (Level AAA)

AC: Specifying the cascade would seem to lead to a confusing UI. Better to have a quick way to view all the options if the preferred one isn't available.

1.1.6 Size and Position of Time-Based Media Alternatives: The user can configure recognized alternative content for time-based media (e.g. captions, sign language video) as follows: (Level AAA) (a) The user can resize alternative content for time-based media up to the size of the user agent's viewport. (b) The user can reposition alternative content for time-based media to at least above, below, to the right, to the left, and overlapping the primary time-based media.

AC: This is a lot of configurability.
JR: Right-and-left is a challenge with horizontally flowing languages like English.

1.2.1 Support Repair by Assistive Technologies: If text alternatives for non-text content are missing or empty then both of the following are true: (Level AA) (a) the user agent does not attempt to repair the text alternatives with text values that are also available to assistive technologies. (b) the user agent makes metadata related to the non-text content available programmatically (and not via fields reserved for text alternatives).

JR: ATAG SC on which this was once based is now more clear (B.2.3.2)...rules out "No Generic or Irrelevant Strings: Generic strings (e.g. "image") and irrelevant strings (e.g., the file name, file format) are not used as text alternatives"

1.2.2 Repair Missing Structure: The user can specify whether or not the user agent should attempt to insert the following types of structural markup on the basis of author-specified presentation attributes (e.g.. position and appearance): (Level AAA) (a) Labels (b) Headers (e.g. heading markup, table headers)



1.3.1 Highlighted Items: The user can specify that the following classes be highlighted so that each is uniquely distinguished: (Level A) (a) selection (b) active keyboard focus (indicated by focus cursors and/or text cursors) (c) recognized enabled input elements (distinguished from disabled elements) (d) elements with alternative content (e) recently visited links



1.3.2 Highlighting Options: When highlighting classes specified by 1.3.1 Highlighted Items, the user can specify highlighting options that include at least: (Level AA) (a) foreground colors, (b) background colors, and (c) borders (configurable color, style, and thickness)

AC: This seems like too much configurability, especially if the user agent developer has chosen highlighting styling to maximize visibility within the widest variety of possible content situations. Fluid UIOptions for example enlarges input fields and makes images underlined and bold.

1.4.1 Configure Rendered Text: The user can globally set any or all of the following characteristics of visually rendered text content, overriding any specified by the author or user agent defaults: (Level A) (a) text scale (the general size of text) (b) font family (c) text color (foreground and background) (d) line spacing (e) character spacing



1.4.2 Preserving Size Distinctions: The user can specify whether or not distinctions in the size of rendered text are preserved when that text is rescaled (e.g. headers continue to be larger than body text). (Level A)



1.5.1 Global Volume: The user can independently adjust the volume of all audio tracks, relative to the global volume level set through operating environment mechanisms. (Level A)

JR: Seems like a lot for A. Maybe AA.

1.6.1 Speech Rate, Volume, and Voice: If synthesized speech is produced, the user can specify the following: (Level A) (a) speech rate, (b) speech volume (independently of other sources of audio), and (c) voice, when more than one voice option is available



1.6.2 Speech Pitch and Range: If synthesized speech is produced, the user can specify the following if offered by the speech synthesizer: (Level AA) (a) pitch (average frequency of the speaking voice), and (b)  pitch range (variation in average frequency)



1.6.3 Advanced Speech Characteristics: The user can adjust all of the speech characteristics offered by the speech synthesizer. (Level AAA)



1.6.4 Synthesized Speech Features: If synthesized speech is produced, the following features are provided: (Level AA) (a) user-defined extensions to the synthesized speech dictionary, (b) "spell-out", where text is spelled one character at a time, or according to language-dependent pronunciation rules, (c) at least two ways of speaking numerals: spoken as individual digits and punctuation (e.g. "one two zero three point five" for 1203.5 or "one comma two zero three point five" for 1,203.5), and spoken as full numbers are spoken (e.g. "one thousand, two hundred and three point five" for 1203.5), (d) at least two ways of speaking punctuation: spoken literally, and with punctuation understood from natural pauses.



1.7.1 Support User Stylesheets: If the user agent supports a mechanism for authors to supply stylesheets, the user agent also provides a mechanism for users to supply stylesheets. (Level A)



1.7.2 Apply User Stylesheets: If user style sheets are supported, then the user can enable or disable user stylesheets for: (Level A) (a) all pages on specified websites, or (b) all pages



1.7.3 Author Style Sheets: If the user agent supports a mechanism for authors to supply stylesheets, the user can disable the use of author style sheets on the current page. (Level A)



1.7.4 Save Copies of Stylesheets: The user can save copies of the stylesheets referenced by the current page, in order to edit and load the copies as user stylesheets. (Level AA)



1.8.1 Highlight Viewport: The viewport with the input focus is highlighted and the user can customize attributes of the highlighting mechanism (e.g. shape, size, stroke width, color, blink rate). The viewport can include nested viewports and containers. (Level A)

JR: Maybe highlighting customization part should be AA?

1.8.2 Move Viewport to Selection and Focus: When a viewport's selection or input focus changes, the viewport's content moves as necessary to ensure that the new selection or input focus location is at least partially in the visible portion of the viewport. (Level A)



1.8.3 Resize Viewport: The user can resize graphical viewports within the limits of the display, overriding any values specified by the author. (Level A)

JR: Maybe AA? I'm concerned this might be read that each viewport needs to be configurable separately? Should it say top-level viewport?

1.8.4 Viewport Scrollbars: When the rendered content extends beyond the viewport dimensions, users can have graphical viewports include scrollbars, overriding any values specified by the author. (Level A)



1.8.5 Indicate Viewport Position: The user can determine the viewport's position relative to the full extent of the rendered content. (Level A)



1.8.6: Zoom: The user can rescale content within graphical viewports as follows: (Level A) (a) Zoom in: to at least 500% of the default size; and (b) Zoom out: to at least 10% of the default size, so the content fits within the height or width of the viewport.

JR: I'm concerned this might be read that each viewport needs to be configurable separately? Should it say top-level viewport?

1.8.7 Maintain point of regard: To the extent possible, the point of regard remains visible and at the same location within the viewport when the viewport is resized, when content is zoomed or scaled, or when content formatting is changed. (Level A)



1.8.8 Viewport History: For user agents that implement a viewport history mechanism (e.g. "back" button), the user can return to any state in the viewport history that is allowed by the content, including a restored point of regard, input focus and selection. (Level AA)

JR: I'm concerned this might be read that each viewport needs to be configurable separately? Should it say top-level viewport? Wording if we should group together top-level viewport SCs for clarity.

1.8.9 Open on Request: The user can specify whether author content can open new top-level viewports (e.g. windows or tabs). (Level AA)



1.8.10 Do Not Take Focus: If new top-level viewports (e.g. windows or tabs) are configured to open without explicit user request, the user can specify whether or not top-level viewports take the active keyboard focus when they open. (Level AA)



1.8.11 Same UI: The user can specify that all top-level viewports (e.g. windows or tabs) follow the defined user interface configuration. (Level AA)



1.8.12 Reflowing Zoom: The user can request that when reflowable content in a graphical viewport is rescaled, it is reflowed so that one dimension of the content fits within the height or width of the viewport. (Level AA)

JR: usual wording is specify rather than "request". BTW all of the "specifies" make it sound like a lot of settings are required....could some be rewritten in the form:  "When reflowable content in a graphical viewport is rescaled, it can be reflowed so that one dimension of the content fits within the height or width of the viewport."

1.8.13 Webpage Bookmarks: The user can mark items in a webpage, then use shortcuts to navigate back to marked items. The user can specify whether a navigation mark disappears after a session, or is persistent across sessions. (Level AAA)



1.9.1 Outline View: Users can view a navigable outline of rendered content composed of labels for important elements, and can move focus efficiently to these elements in the main viewport. (Level AA)



1.9.2 Source View: The user can view all source text that is available to the user agent. (Level AAA)



1.10.1 Access Relationships: The user can access explicitly-defined relationships based on the user's position in content (e.g. show the label of a form control, show the headers of a table cell). (Level AA)

JR: What does "can access" mean?

1.10.2 Access to Element Hierarchy: The user can determine the path of element nodes going from the root element of the element hierarchy to the currently focused or selected element. (Level AAA)

JR: This one say "can determine". Same as "can access"?

2.1.1 Keyboard Operation: All functionality can be operated via the keyboard using sequential or direct keyboard commands that do not require specific timings for individual keystrokes, except where the underlying function requires input that depends on the path of the user's movement and not just the endpoints (e.g. free hand drawing). This does not forbid and should not discourage providing other input methods in addition to keyboard operation including mouse, touch, gesture and speech. (Level A)



2.1.2 Keyboard Focus: Every viewport has an active or inactive keyboard focus at all times. (Level A)

JR: Is this still needed with 1.8.1 and 1.8.8?

2.1.3 No Keyboard Trap: If keyboard focus can be moved to a component using a keyboard interface (including nested user agents), then focus can be moved away from that component using only a keyboard interface. If this requires more than unmodified arrow or tab keys (or other standard exit methods), users are advised of the method for moving focus away. (Level A)



2.1.4 Separate Selection from Activation: The user can specify that focus and selection can be moved without causing further changes in focus, selection, or the state of controls, by either the user agent or author content. (Level A)



2.1.5 Follow Text Keyboard Conventions: The user agent follows keyboard conventions for the operating environment. (Level A)

JR: Does "author content" need a definition? Sometimes also says "author supplied"

2.1.6 Efficient Keyboard Access: The user agent user interface includes mechanisms to make keyboard access more efficient than sequential keyboard access. (Level A)



2.2.1 Sequential Navigation Between Elements: The user can move the keyboard focus backwards and forwards through all recognized enabled elements in the current viewport. (Level A)



2.2.2 Sequential Navigation Between Viewports: The user can move the keyboard focus backwards and forwards between viewports, without having to sequentially navigate all the elements in a viewport. (Level A)



2.2.3 Default Navigation Order: If the author has not specified a navigation order, the default sequential navigation order is the document order. (Level A)



2.2.4 Options for Wrapping in Navigation

JR: Should this be AA? Missing ":". Also, wording feels odd (allow it to be turned off, alert when it is done).

2.3.1 Direct Navigation to Important Elements: The user can navigate directly to any important elements (e.g. structural or operable) in rendered content. (Level AA)

JR: Maybe remove "any" and the e.g....it is really important the reader views the definition.

2.3.2 Present Direct Commands from Rendered Content (enhanced): The user can have any recognized direct commands in rendered content (e.g. accesskey, landmark) be presented with their associated elements (e.g. Alt+R to reply to a web email). (Level AA)

JR: Says "Enhanced" but there is no minimum. Prefer to have just one e.g. per sentence rather than two.

2.3.3 Direct activation of Enabled Elements: The user can move directly to and activate any enabled element in rendered content. (Level A)

JR: Perhaps AA?

2.3.4 Present Direct Commands in User Interface: The user can have any direct commands in the user agent user interface (e.g. keyboard shortcuts) be presented with their associated user interface controls (e.g. "Ctrl+S" displayed on the "Save" menu item and toolbar button). (Level AA)

JR: Again, prefer just one e.g.

2.3.5 Customize Keyboard Commands: The user can override any keyboard shortcut including recognized author supplied shortcuts (e.g. accesskeys) and user agent user interface controls, except for conventional bindings for the operating environment (e.g. arrow keys for navigating within menus). The rebinding options must include single-key and key-plus-modifier keys if available in the operating environment. The user must be able to save these settings beyond the current session. (Level AA)

JR: Save requirement should be removed as it is covered by 2.7.1. Also the single-key and key-plus-modifier text seems like overkill.

2.4.1 Text Search: The user can perform a search within rendered content (e.g. not hidden with a style), including rendered text alternatives and rendered generated content, for any sequence of printing characters from the document character set. (Level A)

JR: Can e.g. be removed?

2.4.2 Find Direction: The user can search forward or backward in rendered content. (Level A)



2.4.3 Match Found: When a search operation produces a match, the matched content is highlighted, the viewport is scrolled if necessary so that the matched content is within its visible area, and the user can search from the location of the match. (Level A)



2.4.4 Alert on Wrap or No Match: The user can be notified when there is no match to a search operation. The user can be notified when the search continues from the beginning or end of content. (Level A)



2.4.5 Search alternative content: The user can perform text searches within textual alternative content (e.g. text alternatives for non-text content, captions) even when the textual alternative content is not rendered onscreen. (Level AA)



2.5.1 Location in Hierarchy: When the user agent is presenting hierarchical information, but the hierarchy is not reflected in a standardized fashion in the DOM or platform accessibility services, the user can view the path of nodes leading from the root of the hierarchy to a specified element. (Level AA)

JR: How is this related to 1.10.2?

2.5.2 Navigate by structural element: The user agent provides at least the following types of structural navigation, where the structure types exist:(Level AA) (a) by heading (b) within tables

JR: How is this related to 1.10.1?

2.5.3 Configure Elements for Structural Navigation: The user can configure sets of important elements (including element types) for structured navigation and hierarchical/outline view. (Level AAA)

JR: "configure sets of" implies ability to create multiple sets

2.6.1 Access to input methods: The user can discover recognized input methods explicitly associated with an element, and activate those methods in a modality independent manner. (Level AA)

JR: User can discover?

2.7.1 Persistent Accessibility Settings: User agent accessibility preference settings persist between sessions. (Level A)

JR: Maybe reword to use the term "saved"

2.7.2 Restore all to default: The user can restore all preference settings to default values. (Level A)



2.7.3 Multiple Sets of Preference Settings: The user can save and retrieve multiple sets of user agent preference settings. (Level AA)



2.7.4 Change preference settings outside the user interface: The user can adjust any preference settings required to meet the User Agent Accessibility Guidelines (UAAG) 2.0 from outside the user agent user interface. (Level AA)

JR: AAA perhaps?

2.7.5 Portable Preference Settings: The user can transfer all compatible user agent preference settings between computers. (Level AAA)

JR: "computers" sounds outdated.

2.8.1 Customize display of controls representing user interface commands, functions, and extensions: The user can customize which user agent commands, functions, and extensions are displayed within the user agent's user interface as follows:(Level AA) (a) Show: The user can choose to display any controls available within the user agent user interface, including user-installed extensions. It is acceptable to limit the total number of controls that are displayed onscreen. (b) Simplify: The user can simplify the default user interface by choosing to display only commands essential for basic operation (e.g. by hiding some control). (c) Reposition: The user can choose to reposition individual controls within containers (e.g. Toolbars or tool palettes), as well as reposition the containers themselves to facilitate physical access (e.g. To minimize hand travel on touch screens, or to facilitate preferred hand access on handheld mobile devices). (d) Assign Activation Keystrokes or Gestures: The user can choose to view, assign or change default keystrokes or gestures used to activate controls. (e) Reset: The user has the option to reset the containers and controls to their original configuration.

JR: This SC is probably twice as long as the next biggest. Has a different feel.

2.8.2 Reset Toolbar Configuration: Guideline 2.9 - Allow time-independent interaction.

JR: This is an orphan handle.

2.9.1 Adjustable Timing: Where time limits for user input are recognized and controllable by the user agent, the user can extend the time limits. (Level A)



2.9.2 Retrieval Progress: By default, the user agent shows the progress of content retrieval. (Level A)

JR: I think this is in the wrong GL, it doesn't allow time-independent interaction

2.10.1 Three Flashes or Below Threshold: In its default configuration, the user agent does not display any user interface components or recognized content that flashes more than three times in any one-second period, unless the flash is below the general flash and red flash thresholds. (Level A)

JR: This is good for the User Agent UI, but hard to automatically determine in playing content. Perhaps 2.11.1 handles this?

2.10.2 Three Flashes: In its default configuration, the user agent does not display any user interface components or recognized content that flashes more than three times in any one-second period (regardless of whether not the flash is below the general flash and red flash thresholds). (Level AAA)

JR: Could this also then be removed?

2.11.1 Time-Based Media Load-Only: The user can override the play on load of recognized time-based media content such that the content is not played until explicit user request. (Level A)



2.11.2 Execution Placeholder: The user can render a placeholder instead of executable content that would normally be contained within an on-screen area (e.g. Applet, Flash), until explicit user request to execute. (Level A)



2.11.3 Execution Toggle: The user can turn on/off the execution of executable content that would not normally be contained within a particular area (e.g. Javascript). (Level A)



2.11.4 Playback Rate Adjustment for Prerecorded Content: The user can adjust the playback rate of prerecorded time-based media content, such that all of the following are true: (Level A) (a) The user can adjust the playback rate of the time-based media tracks to between 50% and 250% of real time. (b) Speech whose playback rate has been adjusted by the user maintains pitch in order to limit degradation of the speech quality. (c) Audio and video tracks remain synchronized across this required range of playback rates. (d) The user agent provides a function that resets the playback rate to normal (100%).

JR: Could this be AA?

2.11.5 Stop/Pause/Resume Time-Based Media: The user can stop, pause, and resume rendered audio and animation content (including video, animated images, and changing text) that last three or more seconds at their default playback rate. (Level A)

JR: 3 seconds seems weirdly short

2.11.6 Navigate Time-Based Media: The user can navigate along the timebase using a continuous scale, and by relative time units within rendered audio and animations (including video and animated images) that last three or more seconds at their default playback rate. (Level A)

JR: 3 seconds seems weirdly short

2.11.7 Semantic Navigation of Time-Based Media: The user can navigate by semantic structure within the time-based media, such as by chapters or scenes present in the media. (Level AA)



2.11.8 Track Enable/Disable of Time-Based Media: During time-based media playback, the user can determine which tracks are available and select or deselect tracks, overriding global default settings, such as captions or audio descriptions. (Level AA)

JR: Both the examples in the implementing document are taken care of by something in GL1.1? So perhaps this can be removed.

2.11.9 Video Contrast and Brightness: Users can adjust the contrast and brightness of visual time-based media. (Level AAA)



2.12.1 Support Platform Text Input Devices: If the platform supports text input using an input device, the user agent is compatible with this functionality. (Level A)



2.12.2 Operation With Any Device: If an input device is supported by the platform, all user agent functionality other than text input can be operated using that device. (Level AA)



2.12.3 Text Input With Any Device: If an input device is supported by the platform, all user agent functionality including text input can be operated using that device. (Level AAA)



3.1.1 Reduce Interruptions: The user can avoid or defer recognized non-essential or low priority messages and updating/changing information in the user agent user interface and rendered content. (Level AA)

JR: Maybe remove "and rendered content". Only mechanism for this in content would seem to be politeness level and implementing that is should following the content spec.

3.2.1 Form Submission: The user can specify whether or not recognized form submissions must be confirmed. (Level AA)



3.2.2 Back Button: The user can reverse recognized navigation between web addresses (e.g. standard "back button" functionality). (Level AA)



3.2.3 Provide spell checking functionality: User agents provide spell checking functionality for text created inside the user agent. (Level AA)



3.2.4 Text Entry Undo: The user can reverse recognized text entry actions prior to submission. (Level A)



3.2.5 Settings Change Confirmation: If the user agent provides mechanisms for changing its user interface settings, it either allows the user to reverse the setting changes, or the user can require user confirmation to proceed. (Level A)



3.3.1 Accessible documentation: The product documentation is available in a format that meets success criteria of WCAG 2.0 Level "A" or greater. (Level A)

JR: "conforms to least WCAG 2.0 Level A.

3.3.2 Document Accessibility Features: All features of the user agent that meet User Agent Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 success criteria are documented. (Level A)

JR: The corresponding ATAG2 SC was rewritten: http://www.w3.org/WAI/AU/ATAG20/#sc_a421

3.3.3 Changes Between Versions: Changes to features that meet UAAG 2.0 success criteria since the previous user agent release are documented. (Level AA)

JR: Still needed?

3.3.4 Centralized View: There is a dedicated section of the documentation that presents a view of all features of the user agent necessary to meet the requirements of User Agent Accessibility Guidelines 2.0. (Level AAA)



3.4.1 Avoid unpredictable focus: The user can prevent focus changes that are not a result of explicit user request. (Level A)

JR: This seems like the superset (and so the possible replacement) of 1.8.9 and 2.1.4.

4.1.1 Platform Accessibility Services: The user agent supports relevant platform accessibility services. (Level A)



4.1.2 Name, Role, State, Value, Description: For all user interface components including user interface, rendered content, generated content, and alternative content, the user agent makes available the name, role, state, value, and description via platform accessibility services. (Level A)

JR: Isn't this implementation detail for 4.1.1?

4.1.3 Accessible Alternative: If a component of the user agent user interface cannot be exposed through platform accessibility services, then the user agent provides an equivalent alternative that is exposed through the platform accessibility service. (Level A)



4.1.4 Programmatic Availability of DOMs: If the user agent implements one or more DOMs, they must be made programmatically available to assistive technologies. (Level A)



4.1.5 Write Access: If the user can modify the state or value of a piece of content through the user interface (e.g., by checking a box or editing a text area), the same degree of write access is available programmatically. (Level A)

JR: Still isn't possible for ARIA as far as I know.

4.1.6 Expose Accessible Properties: If any of the following properties are supported by the platform accessibility services, make the properties available to the accessibility platform architecture: (Level A) (a) the bounding dimensions and coordinates of onscreen elements (b) font family of text (c) font size of text (d) foreground color of text (e) background color of text. (f) change state/value notifications (g) selection (h) highlighting (i) input device focus (j) direct keyboard commands (k) underline of menu items (keyboard command/shortcuts)

JR: Why is this split from 4.1.2?

4.1.7 Timely Communication: For APIs implemented to satisfy the requirements of UAAG 2.0, ensure that programmatic exchanges proceed at a rate such that users do not perceive a delay. (Level A)



5.1.1 WCAG Compliant: Web-based user agent user interfaces meet the WCAG 2.0 success criteria: Level A to meet WCAG 2.0 Level A success criteria; Level AA to meet WCAG 2.0 Level A and AA success criteria; Level AAA to meet all WCAG 2.0 success criteria. (Level AAA)

JR: Might want to remove Level AAA since it will be hard to find implementations.

5.1.2 Implement accessibility features of content specs: Implement and cite in the conformance claim the accessibility features of content specifications. Accessibility features are those that are either (Level A): (a) Identified as such in the specification or (b) Allow authors to satisfy a requirement of WCAG

JR: This is central to the whole thing and it seems buried here.

5.1.3 Implement Accessibility Features of platform: If the user agent contains non-web-based user interfaces, then those user interfaces follow user interface accessibility guidelines for the platform. (Level A)



5.1.4 Handle Unrendered Technologies: If the user agent does not render a technology, the user can choose a way to handle content in that technology (e.g. by launching another application or by saving it to disk). (Level A)

JR: Is this an accessibility issue?

5.1.5 Alternative content handlers: The user can select content elements and have them rendered in alternative viewers. (Level AA)

JR: Why is this AA if this user agent does a good job of making them accessible?

5.1.6 Enable Reporting of User Agent Accessibility Faults: The user agent provides a mechanism for users to report user agent accessibility issues. (Level AAA)






Cheers,

Jan





(MR) JAN RICHARDS

PROJECT MANAGER

INCLUSIVE DESIGN RESEARCH CENTRE (IDRC)

OCAD UNIVERSITY



T 416 977 6000 x3957

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E jrichards@ocadu.ca
Received on Tuesday, 18 June 2013 21:15:05 UTC

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