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Fwd: Action 723 on to you

From: Jim Allan <jimallan@tsbvi.edu>
Date: Thu, 26 Apr 2012 12:57:18 -0500
Message-ID: <CA+=z1W=7AmpzuC-vadTLS+dvHULXMuYwr_2DGJDUgAXCg7M_BQ@mail.gmail.com>
To: WAI-ua <w3c-wai-ua@w3.org>
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jim Allan <jimallan@tsbvi.edu>
Date: Thu, Apr 26, 2012 at 11:10 AM
Subject: Re: Action 723 on to you
To: kim@redstartsystems.com




>  Created ACTION-723 - Rewrite 133 to eliminate a) and make b the focus of
> it be b. need some rewording on the (e.g. ) perhaps eliminate. [on Kimberly
> Patch - due 2012-04-19].
>

Hi Kim,
I made the edits to 1.3.3, marked by <ins>xxx</ins>
After thinking about 1.3.3 it seems to be a waste of ink. Javascript is
increasingly being abstracted to attached .js files. The js triggers on
@class or @id attributes and there is nothing in the actual html (like
onClick or onKeyPress) for the user agent to know what to repair. That is
the js behavior is unrecognized by the user agent. onClick etc. are quickly
falling out of favor, to me this seems like an AA repair of a nearly
extinct coding practice. I would propose removing it from the guidelines.
What are your thoughts?
Jim

>
> 1.3.1 Highlighted Items: The user can specify that the following classes
> be highlighted so that each is uniquely distinguished: (Level A)## DONE 5
> April 2012
>
> (a) selection
>
> (b) active keyboard focus (indicated by focus cursors and/or text cursors)
>
> (c) recognized enabled elements (distinguished from disabled elements)
>
> (d) elements with alternative content (see 1.1.2)
>
> (e) recently visited links
>
> Intent of Success Criterion 1.3.1:
> Users need to be able to easily discover what web content they can
> interact with. They need to highlight selection, content focus, enabled
> elements and links (including recently visited links) in order to
> successfully discover and interact with the web content.
>
> On some pages controls may be difficult to discern amid a large amount of
> other content, or may be styled in ways that make them difficult to
> distinguish from other content.
>
> This can be particularly difficult for people with visual impairments, who
> may not be able to easily distinguish visual differences that may be subtle
> or obvious to users with average vision. This can also be difficult for
> people with some cognitive impairments, who may have difficulty
> distinguishing between items with similar or non-standard appearance. The
> ability to have these items visually distinguished can greatly help reduce
> the amount of time or number of commands these groups require to examine a
> page.
>
> Note: In addition to these required categories, it is recommended that
> user agents also allow the user to highlight the active viewport, even when
> it is a frame or similar within the active window. This makes it much
> easier for the user to visually locate the active focus.
>
> Note: Platform conventions will dictate whether or not an inactive
> keyboard focus (keyboard focus in an inactive viewport) is visually
> indicated by an inactive cursor.
>
> Note: the definition of visited and unvisited links is up to the user
> agent. In some cases it might be links visited during the current session,
> or in other cases links visited in the browser's history until that is
> cleared.
>
> Examples of Success Criterion 1.3.1:
>
> Jerry is a low vision user. He goes to a website that uses styles to
> override visited link color. He wants to know what links have yet to be
> explored. The user agent provides a dialog box for setting overrides to
> author-selected link colors.
>
> Jerry goes to a website with CSS styles that removes the content focus
> outline. The user agent provides a dialog box for setting overrides to the
> authorís CSS focus outline declaration.
>
> Binh gets easily frustrated when he cannot locate the buttons and links on
> a page, usually because they don't have the standard appearance he's used
> to. By turning on the option to have all links appear in bright purple, and
> all push buttons and the like drawn with a bright purple border, he can
> easily scan the page and find the items he's looking for.
>
> Related Resources for Success Criterion 1.3.1:
>
> UAAG 1.3.2 Highlighting Options, describes user options to configuring how
> these categories are highlighted
>
> UAAG 2.1.? Keyboard Focus requires every window have an active or inactive
> keyboard focus at all times
>
> UAAG 1.8.8 for highlighting a viewport
>
> UAAG 1.8.9 for highlighting an active window
>
> 1.3.3 Highlighted Input Controls: The user can highlight elements with
> scripted input handlers regardless of whether the current state allows the
> input handlers to operate when they are recognized.  (Level AA)
>
> (Intent of Success Criterion 1.3.3:
> <ins>This is a user agent repair function. Some elements with scripted
> behaviors created by developers look like links, buttons or other enabled
> element but are not coded as such. These elements do not appear in tab
> order, nor do they receive focus. </ins>Users need to be able to easily
> discover what web content they can interact with whether or not the current
> state allows input handlers (e.g. images or text ranges that have onClick
> or onKeyPress events) to operate when they are recognized <ins>by the user
> agent.</ins>
>
>
> Note: This success criterion works in conjunction with 1.3.1 Highlighted
> Items, which ensures that the user can highlight elements, and with 1.3.2
> Highlighting Options, which ensures that the user can customize the
> highlighting to meet their visual or cognitive needs.
>
> Examples of Success Criterion 1.3.3:
>
> <ins>*Belinda, a keyboard only user, sees many icons on the page that
> look like they could be link. When she tries to tab to them they do not
> receive focus. She turns on her browsers repair function. It visually
> highlights those icons with scripting actions associated them so they
> appear as enabled elements. Belinda can then arrow to the icon and activate
> them with the space bar.*
> </ins>
>

>
> Related Resources for Success Criterion 1.3.3:
>
> 1.1.3 Identify Presence of Alternative Content (Level A) requires items
> with alternative content to be highlighted.
>
> 1.3.1 Highlighted Items (Level A) requires highlighting of additional
> classes, including the selection, the active keyboard focus, and visited
> and unvisited links.
>
> 1.3.2 Highlighting Options (Level A) requires the user be able to
> customize the appearances of these highlights.
>
>

-- 
Jim Allan, Accessibility Coordinator & Webmaster
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
1100 W. 45th St., Austin, Texas 78756
voice 512.206.9315    fax: 512.206.9264  http://www.tsbvi.edu/
"We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us." McLuhan, 1964



-- 
Jim Allan, Accessibility Coordinator & Webmaster
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
1100 W. 45th St., Austin, Texas 78756
voice 512.206.9315    fax: 512.206.9264  http://www.tsbvi.edu/
"We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us." McLuhan, 1964
Received on Thursday, 26 April 2012 17:57:49 GMT

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