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ACTION-480 - Rewrite 3.3.2 document accessibility features, to mirror ATAG20, include Simon Definition in the intent

From: Jim Allan <jimallan@tsbvi.edu>
Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2010 13:39:34 -0600
Message-ID: <AANLkTik4=e-4_44WL-Hp5WwQRmC-Mo_sAJi=tejY715S@mail.gmail.com>
To: WAI-ua <w3c-wai-ua@w3.org>
Current 3.3.2
3.3.2 (former 5.3.2) Document Accessibility Features: All user agent
features that benefit accessibility are documented. (Level A)

Proposed - this is a slight rewording of ATAG 4.2.1

3.3.2 All features that are necessary to meet the requirements of this
document (e.g. keyboard shortcuts, text search, etc.) are documented.

/proposed

Current Intent of Success Criterion 3.3.2 (former 5.3.2) :
User agent documentation that includes listings and descriptions of
features supporting or benefiting accessibility permits users to have
access to a description of accessibility and compatibility features.
This benefits all users with disabilities who may require assistance
in identifying which accessibility features may be present or how to
configure those features to work with assistive technology.

The user should be able to easily discover detailed information about
the user agentís adherence to accessibility standards, including those
related to content such as HTML and WAI-ARIA, platform standards such
as MSAA or JAA, and third-party standards such as ISO 9241-171, and
should be able to do so without installing and testing the
accessibility features.

Proposed Intent
User agent documentation that includes listings and descriptions of
features supporting or benefiting accessibility permits users access
to a description of accessibility and compatibility features. These
features fall into two groups: (1) those which have been explicitly
created to aid accessibility, possibly in an attempt to follow
guidelines such as these; or (2) those which assist accessibility but
emerge from other functionality not originally created for
accessibility purposes. Further, these accessibility benefits may be
explicit such as the ability to control the User Agent from the
keyboard; or implicit such as the ability to style a page based on a
user supplied style sheet.This benefits all users with disabilities
who may require assistance in identifying which accessibility features
may be present or how to configure those features to work with
assistive technology.

The user should be able to easily discover detailed information about
the user agentís adherence to accessibility standards, including those
related to content such as HTML and WAI-ARIA, platform standards such
as MSAA or JAA, and third-party standards such as ISO 9241-171, and
should be able to do so without installing and testing the
accessibility features.

-- 
Jim Allan, Accessibility Coordinator & Webmaster

Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

1100 W. 45th St., Austin, Texas 78756

voice 512.206.9315††† fax: 512.206.9264† http://www.tsbvi.edu/

"We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us." McLuhan, 1964
Received on Wednesday, 15 December 2010 19:40:04 GMT

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