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Re: User Agent Guidelines: SYMM WG Comments

From: Ian Jacobs <ij@w3.org>
Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1999 22:28:19 -0500
Message-ID: <383B5B53.2D67D333@w3.org>
To: tmichel@w3.org
CC: w3c-wai-ua@w3.org
Thierry MICHEL wrote:
> 
> Here are User Agent Guidelines Comments from the SYMM WG, from Geoff
> Freed/NCAM

Thank you Thierry, Geoff.

> Maybe more to come.
> ----------------------
> 
> 1.  From "Introduction: Orient the User":
> "Graphical clues about browsing context such as frames, proportional
> scroll bars, a visually highlighted selection, etc. help some, but not
> all users, so the context information must be available in a
> device-independent manner."
> 
> GF:
> "Device-dependent" manner is unclear to me.  Perhaps just say that this
> additional information should be selectable by the user?

That's not exactly what it means. It means that the user should have
access
through other modes than graphics to context information. For instance,
a percentage reading on the status bar in text (or just the message
"stalled") can be used by different output devices. Does this clarify?
 
> Same section:
> "Element context. For instance, users with blindness who navigate by
> surfing only the links of a page or presentation..."
> 
> GF:
> Replace "surfing" with "jumping through the links..." or "listening only
> to the links..."

Ok.
 
> 2.  Checkpoint 1.4:
> GF:
> No mention of being able to access all menu items via the keyboard or a
> non-pointing device?

It's already in the Techniques. Will that suffice?
 
> 3.  Guideline 2:
> "Ensure that users have access to all content, notably author-supplied
> alternative equivalents for content (descriptions of images, closed
> captions for video or audio, etc.)"
> 
> GF:
> add "descriptions of images OR MULTIMEDIA, closed captions..."

Ok.
 
> same guideline:
> What is "text directionality"?

English is left-to-right, Hebrew and Arabic right-to-left, etc.
 
> 4.  Checkpoint 2.2:
> "...(e.g., in different languages, different levels of detail, etc.)"
> 
> GF:
> add "different reading levels"

Yes.
 
> 5.  Checkpoint 2.7:
> "When no text equivalent has been specified, indicate what type of
> object is present."
> 
> GF:
> "Specified" is unclear.  Perhaps this should be "When no text equivalent
> has been SUPPLIED..."

Yes. And I think a global replace would be a good idea.
 
> 6.  Checkpoint 3.10:
> "Allow the user to turn on and off automatic content refresh. [Priority
> 3]  For example, when turned off, allow the user to refresh content
> manually instead (through the user interface)."
> 
> GF:
> The user should receive some sort of notification that the content
> actually *needs* refreshing.

Proposed change:

   For example, when turned off, indicate to the user
   that content needs refreshing and allow the user
   to do so through the user interface.

> 7.  Checkpoint 4.9:
> "Allow the user to control the position of audio closed captions."
> 
> GF:
> Delete "audio".  (Captions are captions; there's no need to distinguish
> between "audio" or otherwise.)

Yes. There may be a change from "closed caption" to "caption" based
on other comments from Eric Hansen.
 
> 8.  Checkpoint 4.10:
> "Allow the user to start, stop, pause, and rewind video."
> 
> GF:
> Add "fast forward".

I will add if there are no objections.
 
> 9.  Checkpoint 4.13:
> "Allow the user to start, stop, pause, and rewind audio."
> 
> GF:
> Add "fast forward".

I will add if there are no objections.
 
> Also, there's no mention of closed captions in the audio section.
> Captions are necessary for audio-only clips, too, not just for video
> clips.

PROPOSAL: 
  I would propose merging the audio and video into one section.
  This is an editorial change and would solve the problem.
 
> 10.  Guideline 8:
> "Provide information about resource structure, viewport structure,
> element summaries, etc. that will assist the user understand their
> browsing context."
> 
> GF:
> Small typo-- it should be "...that will assist the user's understanding
> of their browsing context.", or something similar.

Yes.
 
> 11.  Checkpoint 8.5:
> "...the length of an audio or video clip that will be started..."
> 
> GF:
> Change to "...the length AND SIZE of an audio or video clip that will be
> started..."

Ok.
 
> 12.  Checkpoints 11.2 and 11.4:
> These appear to mean the same thing.  True?  If so, one should be
> deleted.

They are slightly different. 11.2 requires that accessibility
features be documented somewhere (the more important requirement). 
11.4 requires a specific section (e.g., entitled "Accessibility
Features") where all features are listed. 

Perhaps a clarifying note to 11.4 would be helpful:

   "For example, list all pertinent features in a chapter 
   entitled "Accessibility Features". Note that this is a more
   specific requirement than checkpoint 11.2.
 
> 13.  Section 3, Terms and Definitions:
> Assistive Technology:
> "...In the area of Web Accessibility, common software-based assistive
> technologies include assistive
> technologies, which rely on other user agents for input and/or output."
> 
> GF:
> It sounds to me like you're defining assistive technology as...
> assistive technology.  Perhaps something like this would be better:
> "...In the area of Web Accessibility, common software-based assistive
> technologies include those which rely on other user agents for input
> and/or output."

Eric Hansen has some comments as well on the definition. Refer to [2].

[2] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-ua/1999OctDec/0338.html
 
> 14.
> Section 3, Terms and Definitions:
> Continuous Equivalent Track:
> "Captions are generally rendered visually by being superimposed over a
> video track..."
> 
> GF:
> Actually, you can put captions just about anywhere you want to, not just
> superimposed over video.  Perhaps change this to, "Captions are
> generally rendered visually by displaying them below, above or
> superimposed over video."

Ok.
 
> 15.
> Section 3, Terms and Definitions:
> Viewports:
> "The user perceives the information through a viewport, which may be a
> window, frame, a piece of paper, a panner, a speaker..."
> 
> GF:
> What's a panner?

Maybe we should delete this. A panner is, for me, a window over content
that you can move around to view different parts of the content.

 - Ian

-- 
Ian Jacobs (jacobs@w3.org)   http://www.w3.org/People/Jacobs
Tel/Fax:                     +1 212 684-1814
Cell:                        +1 917 450-8783
Received on Tuesday, 23 November 1999 22:27:55 UTC

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