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RE: an attempt to refine the "active element" definition which was tied to "focus"

From: Denis Anson <danson@miseri.edu>
Date: Wed, 27 Oct 1999 14:12:43 -0400
To: "mark novak" <menovak@facstaff.wisc.edu>, <ij@w3.org>
Cc: <w3c-wai-ua@w3.org>
Message-ID: <OCEDIDJABCKNMLGMBFLGIEEMCDAA.danson@miseri.edu>
This definition of active element restricts "active element" to those that
can take the focus.  This would include, as noted, links, form controls,
image maps (actually the links within a map).  While the definition mentions
those elements that have scripts associated with them, I don't think they
can necessarily take the focus.  As currently defined, could you move the
focus to an H1 header that has a script on it?

Generically, "active elements" are those that have behaviors.  For some
elements, such as links and form controls, those behaviors are always
present.  For other elements, such as a block of text within a <SPAN> ...
</SPAN> markup, the behaviors may be defined by user whim.

Because of this, we either have to say that focus can be moved to any
element that has behavior, or not tie "focus" and "active element" so
tightly together.

Denis Anson, MS, OTR
Assistant Professor
College Misericordia
301 Lake St.
Dallas, PA 18612

Member since 1989:
RESNA: An International Association of Assistive Techology Professionals
Website: http://www.resna.org
RESNA ANNUAL CONFERENCE -- "RESNA 2000"
ORLANDO, FL, JUNE 28 -- July 2, 2000

-----Original Message-----
From: w3c-wai-ua-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-ua-request@w3.org]On Behalf
Of mark novak
Sent: Wednesday, October 27, 1999 1:34 PM
To: ij@w3.org
Cc: w3c-wai-ua@w3.org
Subject: an attempt to refine the "active element" definition which was tied
to "focus"

>   18.MN: Propose a new definition of active element, based on keyboard
>navigation discussion at F2F meeting


===== proposed=======

Focus

The user focus designates which element in a document is active. The
element with focus is therefore referred to as the active element.  Which
elements can take focus and thus be active depends on the document language,
and whether those features are supported by the user agent. In HTML4.0
documents, for example, elements which can take focus and are thus
capable of being active elements include links, image maps, form
controls, elements with a value for the "longdesc" attribute, and
elements with associated scripts (event handlers) explicitly associated
with them (e.g., through the various "on" attributes).  In the
near future, it is expected that any element defined in the HTML document
language, for example, will be able to accept the focus and thus could be
defined as an active element.

Once an element has the user focus, it may be activated through any number
of
mechanisms, including the mouse, keyboard, an API, etc. The effect
of activation again depends on the element and also whether the user agent
supports that element being active.   For instance, when a link is
activated, the user agent generally retrieves the linked resource.
When a form control is activated, it may change state (e.g., check boxes)
or may take user input (e.g., a text field). Activating an element with a
script assigned for that particular activation mechanism (e.g., mouse
down event, key press event, etc.) causes the script to be executed.

A viewport has at most one focus. When several viewports co-exist,
each may have a focus, but only one is active, called the current
focus. The current focus is generally presented (e.g., highlighted)
in a way that makes it stand out.





==== original====

The user focus designates an active element in a document. Which
elements are active depends on the document language and whether
the features are supported by the user agent. In HTML documents,
for example, active elements include links, image maps, form
controls, elements with a value for the "longdesc" attribute, and
elements with associated scripts (event handlers) explicitly associated
with them (e.g., through the various "on" attributes). An element
with the focus may be activated through any number of mechanisms,
including the mouse, keyboard, an API, etc. The effect of activation
depends on the element. For instance, when a link is activated, the
user agent generally retrieves the linked resource. When a form
control is activated, it may change state (e.g., check boxes) or may
take user input (e.g., a text field). Activating an element with a script
assigned for that particular activation mechanism (e.g., mouse down
event, key press event, etc.) causes the script to be executed. A
viewport has at most one focus. When several viewports co-exist,
each may have a focus, but only one is active, called the current
focus. The current focus is generally presented (e.g., highlighted)
in a way that makes it stand out.



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From: Peggi Mcnairn <PMcnairn@AOL.COM>
Subject:      Re: Choosing and Using an AAC Device
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In response to Barry's message, I also agree with Donna and others!  I am
constantly amazed, even slightly amused, that ANY professional (including
manufacturers/vendors) would assume that taking into consideration all the
needs of a student/client/consumer is a violation of the ASHA code of
ethics.
Such inappropriate comments are harmful and destructive.

Once an appropriate language organization technique/method has been agreed
upon, there are many other factors, including portability and ease of
programming, that should guide the team (including the consumer) in making
appropriate device selections.  Device abandonment continues to be a
critical
issue in the field of AT and will continue to be an issue if we fail to
address all the needs/wants/desires of the end user.

Since were on the topic of ethics, I find it interesting that many
professionals (including many who present at conferences) fail to disclose
their professional/business affiliations with manufacturers/vendors.  The
code of ethics of most professional organizations (including ASHA, RESNA,
IEEE, and ACM) require its members to avoid and to fully disclose all
business relationships in which real or perceived conflicts of interest may
exist.  These organizations also require their members to be honest and
realistic in stating claims or estimates based on available data.  I think
the ACM Code of Ethics says it best by encouraging its members to uphold
the values of equality, tolerance, respect for others, and the principles
of
equal justice...

People who live in glass houses shouldnt throw stones...  Judge not lest ye
be judged...and on and on it goes.  Seems this problem with judging others
is
as old as time itself.  Sigh~~~~~  Wouldnt it be nice if we could simply
stop pointing fingers at each other and try to move forward to improve the
field of AT?

Well, Im putting back on my rose colored glasses and getting back to work.

Have a good week, ya'll!
Peggi

Visit the ACOLUG home page at:
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Received on Wednesday, 27 October 1999 14:10:03 GMT

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