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RE: PROPOSAL: Checkpoints related to TABLE accessibility

From: Charles Oppermann <chuckop@MICROSOFT.com>
Date: Sat, 30 Jan 1999 00:23:49 -0800
Message-ID: <BB61526CDE70D2119D0F00805FBECA2F557118@RED-MSG-55>
To: w3c-wai-ua@w3.org
I mean "special case" because it different from other document object models
(note lower case).  For example, Microsoft Word has for years a range-based
object model that is very different from DOM Level 1.    DOM level 2 is
adding ranges, but there are still many differences between the two object
models.

Similarly, Microsoft Excel has an object model that is also very different.
Accessibility aid vendors that wish to make maximum use of the information
available must "special case" Word, Excel and HTML.

Obviously, the advantage of DOM is that HTML is becoming the new standard
for mid-range text and graphics layout and is being implemented in many
different areas.  The work aid vendors do to implement DOM is well
leveraged, but it still specific to HTML and associated technologies.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jon Gunderson [mailto:jongund@staff.uiuc.edu]
Sent: Friday, January 29, 1999 6:36 AM
To: Charles Oppermann; w3c-wai-ua@w3.org
Subject: RE: PROPOSAL: Checkpoints related to TABLE accessibility


I don't think they need to think of DOM as a special case, just a different
case or representation of information being rendered.  Your demonstrations
of the intergration of HTML into a wide variety of applications at the F2F
meetings would indicate that the is a place for a content model like DOM.
As XML is developed the DOM model will probably become even more important.

Jon



At 01:16 PM 1/28/99 -0800, Charles Oppermann wrote:
>The flip side is asking accessibility aid vendors to special case DOM and
>HTML.  This special code would then only work for HTML presentation.
>
>It's interesting to note that accessibility aids using Active Accessibility
>do not need to alter the visual display, but that screen readers
>manipulating the Dynamic object model actually force specific visual
changes
>to occur on the screen, so that the information can be read off the screen.

Jon Gunderson, Ph.D., ATP
Coordinator of Assistive Communication and Information Technology
Division of Rehabilitation - Education Services
University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign
1207 S. Oak Street
Champaign, IL 61820

Voice: 217-244-5870
Fax: 217-333-0248
E-mail: jongund@uiuc.edu
WWW:	http://www.staff.uiuc.edu/~jongund
	http://www.als.uiuc.edu/InfoTechAccess
Received on Saturday, 30 January 1999 03:23:51 UTC

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