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We run computers

From: Bryan Campbell <bryany@pathcom.com>
Date: Fri, 15 May 1998 15:19:56 -0400
Message-Id: <2.2.32.19980515191956.006b1788@mail.pathcom.com>
To: w3c-wai-ua@w3.org
At 12:09 PM 15-05-98 +0200, Daniel Dardailler <danield@w3.org> wrote in
WD-WAI-UA-BROWSER-0513 comments:

>My comments after DD::
>DD:: Note: I'm ignoring typos and spelling for now.

[snip]

>>   6. [Priority 1]
>>      Keyboard command to switch between default browser presentation and
>>      current user preferences.

>DD:: yes, this is important: to be able to quickly say "take by black on
>white brower default" just for this screwy page. then revert to author 
>choice for next pages.

The idea of temporary change is important because Web designers develop
situations that browsers cannot predict. Its best to give users clear, easy,
& varied navigation controls since the person using the computer is the most
intelligent part of the system. That occurred to me when frame follow
through was discussed. Once a link in 1 frame is picked having the browser
activate the updated frame is a good idea, except there are pages with no
need to change frames. Below is a discussion page URL where visitors pick
messages in the 2nd [upper right] frame which appear in the 3rd frame
http://winweb.winmag.com/bbs//win98/default.htm
There's little need to work in the lower frame unless there's a interesting
link in the message. Of course, screen readers must be told of new text.

Next is a 4 frame page where only frames 2 & 4 need visitor input
http://mateengreenway.simplenet.com
I'd like to see the big browser makers develop a keyboard command to switch
input focus between the 2 frames that use visitor input, once the visitor
determines which frames control navigation. Then the person using the
computer can use frame follow through or manually switch between 2 main
frames, whatever suits page layout.

Regards,
Bryan

-> "I don't need to stand to talk, to advise, & to generally make a pain in
the ass out of myself." Dr. Stephen Franklin, "Babylon 5": 'Shadow Dancing'
Received on Friday, 15 May 1998 15:18:01 UTC

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