W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ua@w3.org > April to June 1998

RE: Tasks: browser <-> screen reader

From: Charles (Chuck) Oppermann <chuckop@MICROSOFT.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Apr 1998 15:29:16 -0700
Message-ID: <E3A3FFB80F5CD1119CED00805FBECA2F03804305@red-msg-55.dns.microsoft.com>
To: w3c-wai-ua@w3.org
<<
I also think it would do no harm to ask browser developpers to include an
accessability section in their documentation explaining some of the things
that can be done and how to do them that would optimize their browsers for
diffferent needs.
>>

Both Internet Explorer 3.x and 4.x include such sections along with many
other Microsoft products.  Here is the text from the Internet Explorer 4.01
help file which has "Accessibility" as a top-level topic.  There are 4
sub-topics:

"Accessibility for people with disabilities"
"Using Accessibility Features"
"Specify Fonts and Colors"
"Keyboard Shortcuts"

In addition, there is a Resource document available at
http://www.microsoft.com/enable/download/ie401ac.exe
<http://www.microsoft.com/enable/download/ie401ac.exe>  and general
information is at http://www.microsoft.com/enable/products/ie4.htm
<http://www.microsoft.com/enable/products/ie4.htm> .

Here is the various portions of the help file pulled together.  Note that
some lines are links to generic pieces of information, I didn't include all
of it:

Accessibility for people with disabilities
Microsoft is committed to making its products and services easier for
everyone to use. This Help file provides information about the following
features, products, and services that make Microsoft products more
accessible for people with disabilities.

Customizing Microsoft Windows or Microsoft Windows NT

Microsoft Services for People Who Are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing

Microsoft Documentation in Alternative Formats

Utilities to Enhance Accessibility

Other Products and Services for People with Disabilities

Note
This information applies only to Microsoft products in the United States.
For products obtained outside the United States, you can contact your
subsidiary to find out whether the products and services described in these
Help topics are available in your area. For a list of worldwide
subsidiaries, see Microsoft Technical Support Worldwide.

Using accessibility features in Internet Explorer
In addition to Microsoft Windows, Windows NT, and Windows 95 accessibility
products and services, the following features make Internet Explorer more
accessible for people with disabilities.


Keyboard access
All features in Internet Explorer are accessible to you by using the
keyboard or the mouse. 

With Internet Explorer, you can explore the Web by using the keyboard. Just
press TAB and SHIFT+TAB to move forward and backward between screen elements
such as:

Links that are text or images

Hotspots on image maps


The Address bar


Frames


For more information about keyboard access, look up "keyboard shortcuts" in
the Help Index.


Highlighting box
As you move to or click a link or image, a one-pixel-wide border appears
around it so you can see what is selected.


Customize the font size, formatting, colors
You can specify the font sizes, styles and colors, and foreground and
background colors of Web pages displayed on your computer screen, even if
the author of the Web page has already specified these. You can also specify
the color used to indicate links in Web pages, or a special color for links
that is used only when the mouse passes over the link. 

This is useful if you have low-vision, need larger fonts, or need
high-contrast colors. You can set Internet Explorer to use the colors and
fonts you specify, your default Windows colors and fonts, or the settings
you specify in your own style sheet.

For more information, see Customizing how Web pages are displayed.


Advanced options which make Internet Explorer more accessible
There are several options which you can select or clear which may make
Internet Explorer more accessible. To get to these options, click the View
menu, click Internet Options, and then click the Advanced tab. 


Move system caret with focus/selection changes 

If you use a screen reader, you may want to select this check box. Some
screen readers or screen magnifiers use the system caret to determine which
area of the screen to read or magnify.


Always expand alternate text for images

Select this check box if you rely on ALT text instead of viewing the actual
pictures (you've cleared the Show pictures check box). This ensures that the
text is not cut off if the amount of text exceeds the image area it
represents.


Launch Channels in full-screen window and Launch Browser in full-screen
window

If you use a screen reader, you may want to clear these check boxes. For
some types of cognitive disabilities, you may want to select these check
boxes.


Use smooth scrolling and Enable page transitions

If you use a screen magnification or screen reader program, you may want to
clear these check boxes. If you use a voice recognition program, you may
experience recognition errors during smooth scrolling and transitions, and
may also want to clear these check boxes.


Use Autocomplete

If you have cognitive disabilites, you may want to clear this check box to
avoid distractions. If you use a blind-access utility, you may want to clear
this check box if your accessibility aid reads the suggestions as the
appear, making typing difficult.


Highlight links when clicked

You may want to select this check box if you have cognitive disabilities, or
have difficulty targeting the link with the mouse. However, if you use a
blind-access utility, it may cause the utility to read the link aloud
unnecessarily, and you may want to clear this check box.


Show pictures, Play Animations, and Play Videos

If you have low-vision, you may want to clear these check boxes to improve
performance. If you are sensitive to screen flashing, you may also want to
clear these check boxes.


Play sounds

If you have cognitive disabilites, you may want to clear this check box to
prevent distractions. If you are blind, you may want to clear this check box
or selectively download sounds so that they do not interfere with a screen
reader reading text aloud. 


Print background colors and images

If you have low vision, you may want to clear this check box to improve
print legibility.


Show font button

If you have low vision, you may want to select this check box for quick
access to the relative font size.


Small icons

If you are using a screen reader, you may want to select this check box to
maximize the amount of screen space available for Web content.

Specify Font and Colors
To specify which font and color settings to always use
On the View menu in the browser, click Internet Options.

On the General tab, click Accessibility.

Change the settings as needed.


Note
For Help on an item, click  at the top of the dialog box, and then click the
item.

Related Topics
Customizing how Web pages are displayed

Controlling how fonts and background colors are displayed

Keyboard Shortcuts
Internet Explorer Web browser keyboard shortcuts
You can use shortcut keys to choose commands and view documents.
To do this	Press this	
Go to next page	ALT+RIGHT ARROW	
Go to previous page	ALT+LEFT ARROW	
Display a shortcut menu for a link	SHIFT+F10	
Move forward between frames	CTRL+TAB	
Move back between frames	SHIFT+CTRL+TAB	
Scroll toward the beginning of a document	UP ARROW	
Scroll toward the end of a document	DOWN ARROW	
Scroll toward the beginning of a document in larger increments	PAGE UP	
Scroll toward the end of a document in larger increments	PAGE DOWN

Move to the beginning of a document	HOME	
Move to the end of a document	END	
Refresh the current page	F5	
Stop downloading a page	ESC	
Go to a new location	CTRL+O	
Open a new window	CTRL+N	
Save the current page	CTRL+S	
Print the current page or active frame	CTRL+P	
Activate a selected link	ENTER	



Charles Oppermann
Program Manager, Active Accessibility, Microsoft Corporation
 <mailto:chuckop@microsoft.com> mailto:chuckop@microsoft.com
<http://microsoft.com/enable/> http://microsoft.com/enable/
"A computer on every desk and in every home, usable by everyone!"
Received on Thursday, 9 April 1998 18:30:19 UTC

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