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From: monty cassellius <will.ben.chase.sam@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 08:29:11 -0500
Message-ID: <CAGA9bey=mkHErKv5KqCA4y-MpXfeuK427kULD4xwTUPPYy2Ncg@mail.gmail.com>
To: Steve Faulkner <faulkner.steve@gmail.com>
Cc: Bryan Garaventa <bryan.garaventa@whatsock.com>, David Ashleydale <david@randomlife.com>, Jonathan Avila <jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com>, w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
hello if anyone can help me switch from single messages to digest mode
be great thanks

On 3/21/13, Steve Faulkner <faulkner.steve@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi Bryan,
>
> ARIA is implemented in browsers, once implemented features are very rarely
> removed.
>
> The hope is that with the addition of new native HTML controls in HTML5,
> developers will use these instead of rolling their own, but from experience
> we know that even basic controls such as buttons that have been around
> since HTML 2.0 are still not used in some circumstances (For example the
> Gmail UI contains  literally hundreds of controls but the vast majority are
> built from divs and spans with ARIA added).
>
> So while it is obviously better that native controls are used as they have
> role,state, property information built in as well as keyboard interaction,
> this is often not the case.
>
> Also it should be noted that HTML5 fills in some of the gaps, but does not
> fill in all of the gaps and that will be the case for the forseeable
> future.
>
> I wrote this a few years ago (needs updating), but it is still the case:
> HTML5 and the myth of WAI-ARIA redundance
> http://blog.paciellogroup.com/2010/04/html5-and-the-myth-of-wai-aria-redundance/
>
> with regards
>
> --
> SteveF
> HTML 5.1 <http://www.w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/>
>  <http://www.paciellogroup.com/resources/wat-ie-about.html>
>
>
> On 20 March 2013 19:29, Bryan Garaventa
> <bryan.garaventa@whatsock.com>wrote:
>
>> **
>> My concern is that ARIA works well right now when properly implemented.
>>
>> Many others have thought the same, and have implemented  ARIA within web
>> applications across the web, not just on single page implementations, but
>> have built ARIA support into CMSs as well.
>>
>> In short, ARIA is now entrenched in the web, and it will likely never
>> leave it regardless what the standards are.
>>
>>
>> So it would be good to know whether ARIA recognition will ever be pulled
>> out of browser and Assistive Technology support, sort of like pulling out
>> the rug from all of these implementations, making previously accessible
>> components suddenly inaccessible?
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> *From:* David Ashleydale <david@randomlife.com>
>> *To:* Bryan Garaventa <bryan.garaventa@whatsock.com>
>> *Cc:* Jonathan Avila <jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com> ; w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, March 20, 2013 12:07 PM
>> *Subject:* Re: ARIA role restrictictions in HTML5
>>
>> It's funny -- I always thought that ARIA would be kind of a preview for
>> HTML 5. That the ARIA attributes would become part of the HTML spec.
>>
>> But it doesn't seem to be turning out like that.
>>
>> David
>>
>> On Wednesday, March 20, 2013, Bryan Garaventa wrote:
>>
>>> **
>>> I agree, anchor elements work well for this purpose, especially for
>>> graceful degradation with radio buttons.
>>>
>>> Regarding buttons, I often see A tags styled as buttons for form
>>> submission elements.
>>>
>>> Not having the ability to put role="button" on such elements to aid
>>> screen reader interaction, would impair accessibility, not enhance it.
>>> The
>>> same is true for Toggle Buttons, and Checkboxes.
>>>
>>> A tags are also used for Listbox Option elements, which is also used to
>>> support
>>> graceful degradation.
>>>
>>> This brings me to a question I've been wondering about.
>>>
>>> Is HTML5 supposed to replace ARIA, or will they work together? In other
>>> words, will components built using current standards compliant ARIA
>>> still
>>> be valid ten or twenty years from now?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ----- Original Message -----
>>> *From:* Jonathan Avila
>>> *To:* w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
>>> *Sent:* Wednesday, March 20, 2013 7:25 AM
>>> *Subject:* ARIA role restrictictions in HTML5
>>>
>>>  I was looking at the latest draft version of the HTML5 specification
>>> and noticed in the implicit aria semantics table it indicates that only
>>> a
>>> limited set of ARIA roles can be used with certain elements such as the
>>> anchor element to conform to the HTML5 specification.  Specifically you
>>> could not use a role of button, radio button, etc. on anchor elements.
>>> This seems problematic but makes good semantic sense.  One advantage of
>>> using anchors with hrefs for diverse ARIA roles is there is some
>>> progressive enhancement support.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> http://www.w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/dom.html#sec-implicit-aria-semantics
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Jonathan
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>
Received on Thursday, 21 March 2013 13:29:39 GMT

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