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Re: title attributes on links

From: Harry Loots <harry.loots@ieee.org>
Date: Mon, 28 May 2012 12:45:31 +0200
Message-ID: <CA++-QFeQ4hqPA0=17AfDe0SQwf_wiU5fhnKKyHvgpp5-XBKe2A@mail.gmail.com>
To: Steve Faulkner <faulkner.steve@gmail.com>
Cc: Ramón Corominas <listas@ramoncorominas.com>, Glen Wallis <glen.wallis@gmail.com>, w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Hi Steve
I agree that there are situations where a visual label element is not
appropriate.

However, instead of  <input type=text title=search>
<button>search</search>(your example), why not use <label><input
type="text" id="search" value="search"></label><button>search</button>?

Regards, Harry

On Mon, May 28, 2012 at 12:16 PM, Steve Faulkner
<faulkner.steve@gmail.com>wrote:

> Hi Harry,
>
> the problem from a design point of view is that in some circumstances a
> visual label is not appropriate as it is redundant. So where design
> dictates that a label is inappropriate, use of the title or aria-label or
> aria-labelldby provides an accessible name.
>
> Dragon has access to the accessible name information via the accessibility
> API, it is up to the user agent in this case to provide the access to the
> control.
>
> I understand what labels do and as a general rule they should be used for
> the reasons you cite, but for example in many applications where a data
> grid is used containing both read only text and form fields (example refer
> to: Form controls in data tables:
> http://www.usability.com.au/resources/wcag2/) then inclusion of a label
> for each control is a non starter.
>
>
> regards
> steveF
>
>
>
> On 28 May 2012 10:51, Harry Loots <harry.loots@ieee.org> wrote:
>
>> Hi Steve
>> The problem as a I see it if title is used instead of label, is that the
>> functionality that comes with label, i.e., being able to click on it and
>> place focus in the associated field element, is lost. Thus a Dragon user
>> will have to execute multiple commands to achieve what they could have
>> achieved with a single command. Similarly, users using magnification, can
>> click on the label, when they've read it, and place the focus in the form
>> field, without having to scroll horizontally.
>> This capability is lost when the title attribute is used on the physical
>> form element.
>> Harry
>>
>>
>> On Mon, May 28, 2012 at 10:37 AM, Steve Faulkner <
>> faulkner.steve@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Hi Harry,
>>>
>>> Providing a control with an accessible name is a level A requirement:
>>> http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/#ensure-compat
>>> using label or title provides a programmatically associated accessible
>>> name for a control. The information is provided by the browsers through the
>>> accessibility API Dragon can access this infromation, if it does not expose
>>> it to the user its a bug in Dragon, not in WCAG 2.0.
>>>
>>> The use of title is only recommended under specific circumstances when a
>>> visible label would be redundant.
>>>
>>> example:
>>>
>>> <input type=text title=search> <button>search</search>
>>>
>>> regards
>>> SteveF
>>>
>>>
>>> On 28 May 2012 09:13, Harry Loots <harry.loots@ieee.org> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Ramón Corominas wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Which makes me wonder why it is acceptable (and even promoted) to use
>>>>> the title instead of a <label> for form controls. Don't we have techniques
>>>>> to hide labels preserving their accessibility?
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Who and why would anyone want to promote a non-accessible technique?
>>>> 'label' is an essential navigation mechanism for people using all kinds of
>>>> AT, as I observed, once again, while testing software with a Dragon user.
>>>> 'label' is even more important than 'alt'!!! While I can describe the
>>>> contents of an image in the content, or even use the 'title' attribute,
>>>> without losing functionality, whereas without the 'label' attribute I have
>>>> reduced functionality and reduced mobility.
>>>>
>>>> Failure to use 'label', if it is not already so, should be a Level A
>>>> infringement!
>>>> Harry
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> with regards
>>>
>>> Steve Faulkner
>>> Technical Director - TPG
>>>
>>> www.paciellogroup.com | www.HTML5accessibility.com |
>>> www.twitter.com/stevefaulkner
>>> HTML5: Techniques for providing useful text alternatives -
>>> dev.w3.org/html5/alt-techniques/
>>> Web Accessibility Toolbar - www.paciellogroup.com/resources/wat-ie-about.html
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
> --
> with regards
>
> Steve Faulkner
> Technical Director - TPG
>
> www.paciellogroup.com | www.HTML5accessibility.com |
> www.twitter.com/stevefaulkner
> HTML5: Techniques for providing useful text alternatives -
> dev.w3.org/html5/alt-techniques/
> Web Accessibility Toolbar - www.paciellogroup.com/resources/wat-ie-about.html
>
>
>
Received on Monday, 28 May 2012 10:46:04 GMT

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