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RE: Alternative Formats

From: Ryan Jean <ryanj@disnetwork.org>
Date: Thu, 28 Aug 2008 12:15:16 -0400
To: "'Mag Leahy'" <magleahy@gmail.com>
Cc: "'Phill Jenkins'" <pjenkins@us.ibm.com>, <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <E1KYkBa-0002PX-ML@bart.w3.org>
Thank you. I'm working on instructions and a plan to make things into
alternative formats, such as Braille, audio CD, and large format. Would
anybody be interested in testing them?

 

Sincerely,

Ryan Jean

Assistant IT Specialist

The Disability Network

Flint, MI

 

  _____  

From: Mag Leahy [mailto:magleahy@gmail.com] 
Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2008 12:04 PM
To: Ryan Jean
Cc: Phill Jenkins; w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Subject: Re: Alternative Formats

 

That's an awesome goal. Right behind you!

On Thu, Aug 28, 2008 at 4:56 PM, Ryan Jean <ryanj@disnetwork.org> wrote:

Thank you for your reply. It's my goal to have EVERYTHING accessible to
EVERYONE.

 

Sincerely,

Ryan Jean

Assistant IT Specialist

The Disability Network

Flint, MI

 

  _____  

From: w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org] On Behalf
Of Phill Jenkins
Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2008 10:04 AM
To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Subject: RE: Alternative Formats

 


>  . . . I was referring to all formats, such as visual, audio, and written.
I do see where all 3 
> of these would fall into web accessibility. Visual for graphics, audio for
sound, and 
 > written for downloading files as PDF or TXT. Do you agree? 

Well, I would expand your simple list to also include the following, quoted
from Understand WCAG: 

*	Controls, Input: If non-text content is a control or accepts user
input, then it has a
<http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/text-equiv-all.html#namedef> name
that describes its purpose. (Refer to
<http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/ensure-compat.html> Guideline 4.1
for additional requirements for controls and content that accepts user
input.) 
*	Time-Based Media: If non-text content is time-based media, then text
alternatives at least provide descriptive identification of the non-text
content. (Refer to
<http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/media-equiv.html> Guideline 1.2
for additional requirements for media.) 
*	Test: If non-text content is a test or exercise that
<http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/text-equiv-all.html#must-nontextd
ef> must be presented in non-text format, then text alternatives at least
provide descriptive identification of the non-text content. 
*	Sensory: If non-text content is primarily intended to create a
<http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/text-equiv-all.html#sensoryexpdef
> specific sensory experience, then text alternatives at least provide
descriptive identification of the non-text content. 
*
<http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/text-equiv-all.html#CAPTCHAdef>
CAPTCHA: If the purpose non-text content is to confirm that content is being
accessed by a person rather than a computer, then text alternatives that
identify and describe the purpose of the non-text content are provided, and
alternative forms of CAPTCHA using output modes for different types of
sensory perception are provided to accommodate different disabilities. 
*	Decoration, Formatting, Invisible: If non-text content is
<http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/text-equiv-all.html#puredecdef>
pure decoration, is used only for visual formatting, or is not presented to
users, then it is implemented in a way that it can be ignored by
<http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/text-equiv-all.html#atdef>
assistive technology.


Regards,
Phill Jenkins
IBM Research - Human Ability & Accessibility Center
http://www.ibm.com/able




-- 
Mag
Received on Thursday, 28 August 2008 16:17:41 GMT

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