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RE: SPAM(7.4) RE: WCAG2 Conformance Questions

From: Ryan Jean <ryanj@disnetwork.org>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2008 09:27:37 -0400
To: "'Joachim Andersson'" <joachim.andersson@etu.se>
Cc: "'Peter Thiessen'" <peter.thiessen@primalfusion.com>, "'Ginger Claassen'" <ginger.claassen@gmx.de>, <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <E1KXc8i-0007Ru-Up@maggie.w3.org>
I will try this and see what happens. However, the content is inside table
cells.

 

Sincerely,

Ryan Jean

Assistant IT Specialist

The Disability Network

Flint, MI

 

  _____  

From: bluebirdsolutions@gmail.com [mailto:bluebirdsolutions@gmail.com] On
Behalf Of Joachim Andersson
Sent: Friday, August 22, 2008 7:09 AM
To: Ryan Jean
Cc: Peter Thiessen; Ginger Claassen; w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Subject: Re: SPAM(7.4) RE: WCAG2 Conformance Questions

 

To accomplish this you need to identify the different parts of your page and
set up a stylesheet that only display the parts you want to print. For
example:

<div id="noprint1">Some text that should not print</div>
<div id="print1">Text that should be printed</div>
<div id="noprint2">More text that should not print</div>

To make the div identified as print1 to print, but not the other two, build
a stylesheet and connect it to your XHTML file:
<link href="print.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="print" />
<!-- Put in head area -->

CSS code (print.css):
#noprint1
{
display: none;
}

#noprint2
{
display: none;
}

This will hide the blocks of content that you do not want to print. 

I hope this solves your problem, without using JavaScript or changing
content that has been loaded on a web page with DOM. This makes the content
accessible to all, and it does not make a difference to what will show on
screen, supposing that you use the attribute media="print" in your link tag.

If you experience problems with a table not acting like you want in this
case, the bigger question is that one should never use tables to present
text content that breaks over rows, as this is not accessible to screen
readers, according to WCAG 1.0. The way to put text in columns is to use div
blocks with float properties set to allow them to render side by side.

Best regards,

Joachim Andersson
Web Accessibility Consultant



2008/8/21 Ryan Jean <ryanj@disnetwork.org>

To answer your first question, I only want that one cell to print, not the
entire table.

 

Usually when I see printer friendly links, it results in a pop-up. If I were
to have it link like that, the content would have to be duplicated on a
separate page, which I don't want to do. Do you know server-side scripting
that will hide the content of the other cells? And not only that, but make
them act like they aren't even there?

 

Sincerely,

Ryan Jean

Assistant IT Specialist

The Disability Network

Flint, MI

 

  _____  

From: bluebirdsolutions@gmail.com [mailto:bluebirdsolutions@gmail.com] On
Behalf Of Joachim Andersson
Sent: Thursday, August 21, 2008 4:12 PM
To: Ryan Jean
Cc: Peter Thiessen; Ginger Claassen; w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Subject: Re: WCAG2 Conformance Questions

 

Hi Ryan,

I am confused about this, and I would like to know more about it. Maybe I am
missing the point. 

Why would you want to extract content from one table cell, so that only that
cells content is viewable? This seems to be inaccessible behaviour to me.
And why is duplicated web content a problem when we have server side
scripting and server side includes?

The way I see it, printer friendlyness is accomplished through CSS, so a
possibility could be to hide the content (based on display value for id or
class name) that you do not want to print. Pop-ups - aren't they already out
of order, as web browsers generally don't allow them?

Maybe, if I understand a bit more about the way you see this, I can
contribute to a good solution.

Best regards,

Joachim Andersson
Web Accessibility Consultant

2008/8/21 Ryan Jean <ryanj@disnetwork.org>

Here is my goal and achievement:

 

I was able to take a page that has a table with multiple cells and extract
only one cell so that only its content is viewable in the current window. I
did this using JS and "document.write()". This has three advantages: it
eliminates a pop-up, a duplicate page is not required, and it is printer
friendly. However, the drawback from that is after the function runs, the
content inside the cell is now not web accessible, via screen readers. It
does still fall under the W3C guidelines because it is readable in table
format, just not after. I wish there was a way we and ARIA could fix this
bug. We know pop-ups are frowned upon in web accessibility and it is twice
as much work for the webmaster to update each page if there is a duplicate
involved. I did find a way around the bug by forcing the content in a
textarea, but that takes away all the images and HTML coding.

 

Sincerely,

Ryan Jean

Assistant IT Specialist

The Disability Network

Flint, MI

 

  _____  

From: w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org] On Behalf
Of Peter Thiessen
Sent: Thursday, August 21, 2008 9:05 AM
To: Ginger Claassen; w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Subject: Re: WCAG2 Conformance Questions

 

Hi Ginger,

here are a few tools:

Open Source Screen Readers that have ARIA support:
-ORCA if your running Linux: http://live.gnome.org/Orca
-NVDA if your running Windows: http://www.nvda-project.org/
-Fire Vox which is a plug-in for Firefox, is handy for Web content browsing:
http://www.firevox.clcworld.net/

Conformance Testing tools
-Valid HTML: http://validator.w3.org/
-Valid CSS: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
-WCAG2 AA conformance A-Checker: http://checker.atrc.utoronto.ca/index.html

 Accessible Web 2.0 content/apps are currently only possible through the
WAI-ARIA specification as people have mentioned. I've written a few papers
on ARIA Live Regions and would be happy give example code etc. if you could
describe the widgets or behavior your trying to achieve in your Web app. I
could also send links to my papers as a shameless plug :) Would people here
find this off topic?

Regards
-peter



On 18/08/08 5:21 AM, "Ginger Claassen" <ginger.claassen@gmx.de> wrote:



Hello all,
I am new to this list and would like to use this occasion to briefly
introduce myself. I am 33 years old and blind and currently want to create a
WCAG 2.0 conform website. I am working in a very small business and we would
like to change our website in a way to make it accessible. I looked around
and found a few tools to evaluate websites in order to make it a bit faster
but so far I could not which one would be good for checking against WCAG
2.0.
Maybe someone in this list can help me and refer one or two good programs or
add-ons. That would be very helpful since checking all pages by hand would
be a very lengthy process.

Thanks in advance for your help and support!

Kind regards


     Ginger Claassen



 

 
Received on Monday, 25 August 2008 13:29:59 GMT

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