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Re: UK Access Rules:

From: Andy Heath <a.k.heath@shu.ac.uk>
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2003 10:24:07 +0100
Message-ID: <3F8E63B7.80503@shu.ac.uk>
To: tcroucher@netalleynetworks.com
Cc: David Sloan <DSloan@computing.dundee.ac.uk>, w3c-wai-ig@w3.org, martin.sloan@orange.net

Is the confusion over the Learning/services split ?

andy


> Well Martin Sloan who runs http://www.web-access.org.uk/ should know so 
> I am copying him in on this mail. My understanding however was that DDA 
> part III does not come into force until October 2004. However if this is 
> incorrect, I will happy concede the point since I probably "read it 
> somewhere" ;).
> 
> Tom
> 
> On Thu, 16 Oct 2003 10:15:09 +0100, David Sloan 
> <DSloan@computing.dundee.ac.uk> wrote:
> 
>>
>>
>> Tom Croucher said: "In the UK currently you are not obligated to be
>> accessible, however in Oct 2004 when the Disability Discrimation Act 
>> of 1995
>> (DDA) part III comes
>> into force then all public web sites (as services I gather, although I am
>> not a lawayer) are obligated to be accessible to a reasonable degree."
>>
>> My understanding is that this is incorrect. Goods, facilities and service
>> providers have been covered since 1999 under the DDA Section III, which
>> requires them not to unjustifiably discriminate against someone on 
>> account
>> of a disability.
>>
>> If they provide goods, facilities and services through a web site, then
>> legal argument has suggested that the web site is covered by this
>> legislation.
>>
>> See:
>> http://elj.warwick.ac.uk/jilt/01-2/sloan.html
>> http://www.rnib.org.uk/xpedio/groups/public/documents/publicwebsite/public_l 
>>
>> egalcase.hcsp
>>
> 
> 
> 


-- 
andy
_______________________________________________
Andy Heath
Sheffield Hallam University
andy@andyheath.org.uk
Received on Thursday, 16 October 2003 05:44:47 GMT

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