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Re: Fw: Web site accessibility-layers

From: Tina Marie Holmboe <tina@elfi.org>
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2003 17:28:03 +0200
To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Message-ID: <20030417172803.B19616@elfi.org>

On Wed, Apr 16, 2003 at 10:31:09PM +0100, David Woolley wrote:

> > >"Layers" is a feature of HTML and CSS that allows content that is
> 
> Layers is a dead end technology in Netscape 4.x, mainly used for
> animation with scripting.

   No, layers is a concept borrowed from the graphical world, where one
  image is a composite of several, layered on top of eachother. It is much
  used in bother computer graphics, but also in photography and filmography.
  The idea might even be much older and spring from painting techniques, but
  I would be on shaky ground indeed to insist on that.

   The LAYER element was Netscape extendocrap, certainly, but the concept
  was not.



> The nearest W3C technology is absolute positioning in CSS.

   Almost. Absolutely positioning in CSS is not really related to layering;
  but using the z-index property to layer absolutely positioned elements is
  another matter.

   I have often heard people state that "There are no layers in CSS", but
  it is hard to take that serious after reading the table-of-contents on
  the CSS 2 specs.




> produce it), but the right way of thinking about it is that you construct
> the document in a logical reading order, then position parts of it 
> to get a particular presentation.

   Indeed. Noone would think of doing it in any OTHER way, would they ?


-- 
 - Tina Holmboe
Received on Thursday, 17 April 2003 11:01:19 GMT

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