W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ig@w3.org > October to December 2002

Re: Rockville, MD- Seeking low vision users for testing federal website

From: Joe Clark <joeclark@joeclark.org>
Date: Tue, 17 Dec 2002 23:14:23 -0500 (EST)
To: Access Systems <accessys@smart.net>
Cc: WAI-IG <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <Pine.BSO.4.40.0212172310050.21449-100000@ns1.seeto.com>

> > ...which you have no evidence they are doing.
>
> authoring to browser behavior is a common error, not one that anyone has
> been accused of doing. it was an example of an often discovered problem

There's still no *evidence*, merely repeated supposition.

> No, but cost and the prerequisites are a significant factor, if one has
> the money and the correct prerequisites then it may be the best choice,
> but if you are like the vast majority of people with disability you live
> below the norm and a significant majority below the poverty level.  not
> even mentioning the 3rd world, which is where the vast majority of
> disabled people actually live

My point is unchanged. The only outcome of this philosophy is to
give adaptive technology away on demand.

> something designed for Jaws or Windows Eyes may not be usable by people
> using non proprietary software, but something designed for Open Source or
> other accessibilty solution can be used by Jaws and Windows Eyes

Name two open-source screen readers that handle Web pages as well as
Jaws or Window-Eyes. And work on common operating systems. And can
be acquired and installed today.

> I disagree, sub-optimal testing is frequently broadcast as the diffinative
> answer, check all the constant changing of eating recommendations, or the
> argument over various needs for medical testing...

Let's not check those. Let's stay on topic.

Read my book chapter for the details.

>  if you test those who use JAWS (for example) how does this affect someone
> who has an obsolete computer and can't afford to purchase a new computer
> to get the new software that is needed to run this latest and greatest
> solution,  accessibility is for EVERYONE not one particular solution.

Only if accessibility were as common as oxygen, and equally free of
charge.

> how much extra does it cost to test with a "free" or open source solution
> to the problem...

I'm still waiting for the names of two open-source screen readers
that handle Web pages as well as Jaws or Window-Eyes. And work on
common operating systems. And can be acquired and installed today.

-- 

  Joe Clark  |  joeclark@joeclark.org
  Author, _Building Accessible Websites_
  <http://joeclark.org/access/> | <http://joeclark.org/book/>
Received on Tuesday, 17 December 2002 23:14:26 GMT

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