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Fw: onclick vs Re: Click here

From: David Poehlman <poehlman1@comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 18:25:09 -0400
To: wai-ig list <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-id: <002e01c24185$f3ef7e90$19e03244@DAVIDPOEHLMAN>

enroll online is sufficient.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jim Ley" <jim@jibbering.com>
Newsgroups: gmane.org.w3c.accessibility.general
To: <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Sent: Sunday, August 11, 2002 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: onclick vs Re: Click here




"Kynn Bartlett" <kynn-edapta@idyllmtn.com> wrote in message
news:a05101002b979fbdfab42@[10.0.1.2]...
>
> At 9:48 PM +0100 8/9/02, David Woolley wrote:
> >  > Saying 'click here' to a speech-input user is a little like
saying
"do you
> >>  see?" to a person who is blind. It isn't quite appropriate. But
beyond
> >>  upsetting them you will probably get your meaning across.
> >
> >This does, however, invalidate the reason for using "click here" in
the
> >first place, which is generally an assumption that the user is too
stupid
> >to follow anything except explicit directions in terms of the
specific
> >technology that they are using.
>
> Sure.  But it's not an accessibility error.  It's just bad style.
>
> Actually, "click here" is also very imperative.  It tells you what to
> do.
>
>       You can enroll online -- just <a>click here</a>!

I agree that this sort of imperative is often liked in webpages, I just
use:

<a>click here to enroll online</a> - which covers both bases.

Jim.
Received on Sunday, 11 August 2002 18:26:06 GMT

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