W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ig@w3.org > January to March 2002

RE: Testing of 14.1 (WCAG 1.0)

From: Charles McCathieNevile <charles@w3.org>
Date: Tue, 12 Mar 2002 13:23:14 -0500 (EST)
To: Jukka Korpela <jukka.korpela@tieke.fi>
cc: <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.30.0203121306440.12453-100000@tux.w3.org>
Anyone for coffee with just a hint of chocolate flavour?

  goliver@accease.com wrote:

  > Anyone ever seriously tested for compliance of an
  > entire web site to 14.1 [1]?

Well, in principle various parts of Australian government have a commitment
to produce things in "plain english".

Testing techniques for this are interesting, and are not in fact
non-existent.

Simple examples include checking the vocabulary used against relatively small
vocabularies (in English you could start with Richard Scarry's Word Book, go
to a primary school picture dictionary, etc) and for any word used not found
in the test vocab you do a thesaurus check, to see if there is a word that is
in the control vocab.

Ask the author to read the two versions and decide if there is anything
missing from the "simplified version". (If they are people who write
guidelines, ask them to get a friend of theirs to do the test <grin/>).

People who produce texts for schools sometimes do a very high quality version
of this, getting skilled editors who are much smarter about language usage
than a simple mechanical process.

And for the real answer:

Inclusion Europe - http://www.inclusion-europe.org - do test their content
for ease of reading, and have a logo that they encourage people to use -
http://www.inclusion-europe.org/selfadvocacy/ - for details. Many of their
member associations test their content too. An example of a page that uses
multimedia as well as simple text is at
http://www.mencap.org.uk/html/about_learning_disability/about_learning_disability.htm
(and it is interesting to reflect on which of the pages linked from there are
considered accessible by the people who are making the page).

cheers

Chaals
Received on Tuesday, 12 March 2002 13:23:21 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Tuesday, 19 July 2011 18:14:01 GMT