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Re: Empty alt tags

From: David Poehlman <poehlman1@comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 22 Feb 2002 17:12:29 -0500
To: Al Gilman <asgilman@iamdigex.net>, W3C WAI-IG list <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-id: <014c01c1bbee$04d568f0$188d3244@cp286066a>
Al Has a point here.  Some things that may be annoying to me will make
the difference between access and lack of access to others.  we live in
a world of diversity among similarities and must strole downtown once in
a while.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Al Gilman" <asgilman@iamdigex.net>
To: "W3C WAI-IG list" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2002 9:19 AM
Subject: Re: Empty alt tags


At 04:13 AM 2002-02-22 , jukka.korpela@tieke.fi wrote:
>
>After all, the only thing that such duplication serves is to
>reinforce some people's tendency to click on anything to see whether
it's a
>link somewhere.
>

This bit of rant is naive with regard to HCI.  In a way that makes it
ill-considered as a basis for building universal-access technology.

The fact that both the text and the icon should be sensitive is a lesson
of human computer interaction learned the hard way (by doing it wrong
and suffering).   Nobody should be expected to regress from that
hard-learned lesson.

It is not just that historically systems have action-enabled one or the
other.  It is a fact that people will differ in what they reach for to
manipulate, and the only safe thing for the UI designer to do is enable
both.

Have people heard of left-brain vs. right-brain diversity among people?

Al
Received on Friday, 22 February 2002 17:12:59 GMT

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