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Re: Captioning and describing video for distance learning

From: geoff freed <geoff_freed@wgbh.org>
Date: 06 Aug 2001 10:05:14 -0400
Message-ID: <-1215030184geoff_freed@wgbh.org>
To: <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>, Jeff Hiles <jeffrey.hiles@wright.edu>, <w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org>
Hi, Jeff:

NCAM, based at WGBH, is currently working with MIT to make an on-line physics course accessible to blind, visually impaired, deaf and hard-of-hearing users.  The on-line course is called PIVoT (Physics Interactive Video Tutor) and contains hundreds of multimedia clips.  You can read about the project at

http://ncam.wgbh.org/webaccess/pivot/index.html

Read all the information here first and take a look at the multimedia clips, then visit the MIT PIVoT Web site at

http://curricula2.mit.edu/pivot/

MIT students are are writing all the captions and descriptions using MAGpie.  You can download your own free copy of the software from

http://ncam.wgbh.org/webaccess/magpie/

Let me know if you have further questions.

Geoff Freed
Project Manager, Access to PIVoT
CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media
WGBH Educational Foundation
geoff_freed@wgbh.org



On Monday, August 6, 2001, Jeff Hiles <jeffrey.hiles@wright.edu> wrote:
>Our university faculty often want to use the same videos for their distance
>learning courses that they use in face-to-face classes. Our multimedia
>specialists can convert videos for streaming or CD-ROMs. They can even add
>tracks for captions and audio description. One thing we're trying to figure
>out, though, is how to get the captions and descriptions.
>
>The things I've read from the Caption Center and from Joe Clark lead me to
>believe that we need skilled professionals to describe and transcribe
>videos.
>
>http://main.wgbh.org/wgbh/pages/captioncenter/
>http://www.joeclark.org/
>
>Unfortunately, people here seem to think we should teach students to do
>captions and audio descriptions. Other proposals include not allowing video
>for distance learning courses at all, or only allowing faculty to use videos
>that come captioned and described.
>
>Does anyone know of schools that have faced this issue squarely and that
>could serve as good examples for how to support accessibility for videos
>used in distance learning classes?
>
>-- 
>Jeff Hiles
>Instructional Web Designer
>Center for Teaching and Learning
>Wright State University
>Dayton, Ohio 45435
>(937) 775-3181
>jeffrey.hiles@wright.edu
>
Received on Monday, 6 August 2001 10:05:47 GMT

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