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RE: need a new tag

From: Miraz Jordan <miraz@firstbite.co.nz>
Date: Mon, 14 May 2001 13:41:06 +1200
Message-Id: <p05100308b724e3cea82d@[10.0.1.3]>
To: <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
At 16:48 -0700 13/05/2001, Charles F. Munat wrote:
>If you want your
>documents to be intelligible, then you must structure them.

Agreed. I spend a lot of time on structure.

>  the average user treats his word processor
>as a glorified typewriter. He may bold text instead of underlining it, he
>might add colors or even experiment with italics and larger type sizes or
>fancy type faces (usually with horrifying results)

Agreed. I've seen many many real life examples of this.

>Do your students the
>favor of making them conscious of the relationship of presentation to
>structure and meaning, and show them the proper way to format a
>document--with Styles. You aren't doing them any favors by teaching them
>that formatting is there just for "looks," as if that were even possible.

I do in fact teach Styles, but not in the first two hour course, 
which is where I drew my example text from and where this discussion 
originated. One of the many arts of teaching  to build-up learning, 
to begin with smaller skills and concepts and use those blocks to 
create ever more advanced sets of skills. Learning to select a word 
or two and format them individually is very much more appropriate for 
my target learners as a basic knowledge. Once they understand that 
concept then we can later introduce the stylesheet concept, which is 
really just applying bulk, appropriate formatting in a consistent and 
intelligent way which aligns with structure.

I'm very uncomfortable with a discussion which began with a query 
about HTML tags now turning into a critique (based on insufficient 
data) of my teaching methods. I would suggest that it return to HTML 
and accessibility discussion.

Another list I'm on discourages off-topic posts which must be "paid 
for" with a tip. I find that a very useful approach which could well 
be adopted more widely. Here then is a tip:

<tip>When creating instructional web pages code the HTML first, with 
structure in mind, and then later create a Stylesheet with your 
presentation suggestions. This helps focus the mind on what is being 
said.</tip>



Cheers,

Miraz

-- 
If you want to double your success rate, you have to quadruple your 
failure rate.
      -Thomas Watson, IBM Founder
Received on Sunday, 13 May 2001 21:45:11 GMT

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