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Re: Please review: Techniques For Evaluation And Implementation Of Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

From: Karl Ove Hufthammer <huftis@bigfoot.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2000 16:29:41 +0100
Message-ID: <017e01bf902a$9703d460$a2349fc3@huftis>
To: "Bruce Bailey" <bbailey@clark.net>, <w3c-wai-er-ig@w3.org>
Cc: "Web Accessibility Initiative" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
----- Original Message -----
From: "Bruce Bailey" <bbailey@clark.net>
To: <w3c-wai-er-ig@w3.org>
Cc: "Web Accessibility Initiative" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2000 10:23 PM
Subject: RE: Please review: Techniques For Evaluation And Implementation
Of Web Content Accessibility Guidelines


> I would point out that <q>--</q> is what both Karl Ove H. and Wendy C.
used
> in the signature portion of their email (a text-only medium) to convey
the
> meaning of a horizontal rule...

Well, actually it's not, it's <q>-- </q> (note the space) which is a
_signature delimiter_. It's used in both e-mail and newsgroups, so that
e-mail clients can automatically remove the signature when replying (no
point in quoting the signature).

          A "personal signature" is a short closing text automatically
          added to the end of articles by posting agents, identifying
          the poster and giving his network addresses, etc. If a poster
          or posting agent does append such a signature to an article,
          it MUST be preceded with a delimiter line containing (only)
          two hyphens (ASCII 45) followed by one SP (ASCII 32). The
          signature is considered to extend from the last occurrence of
          that delimiter up to the end of the article (or up to the end
          of the part in the case of a multipart MIME body). Followup
          agents, when incorporating quoted text from a precursor,
          SHOULD NOT include the signature in the quotation. Posting
          agents SHOULD discourage (at least with a warning) signatures
          of excessive length (4 lines is a commonly accepted limit).

Ufortunately Outlook Express doesn't follow the standard, and actually
*removes* space at the end of the line when sending/posting. Too bad
really, since you then must *manually* remove the signature when
replying.

-- 
Regards,
Karl Ove Hufthammer
Received on Friday, 17 March 2000 11:05:52 GMT

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