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Re: Access Keys for Accessibility

From: Nir Dagan <nir@nirdagan.com>
Date: Sun, 09 May 1999 11:52:45 GMT
Message-Id: <199905091152.OAA42200@pluto.mscc.huji.ac.il>
To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
1. access keys are not necessary for accessibility. So generally there
is no reason to use them.

2. 
> >>>So, I can start with accesskey="1" and go all the way to accesskey="99"
> or even higher?  I'm not sure this would work???

No you can't. The value of accesskey must be a single character from Unicode. 99 is not a single character, it is two characters.

Legal example:

<a href="foo.html" accesskey="&ntilde;">hmmmm...</a>

3. In order to use accesskey you have to detect the user's
keyboard (if any).
I can read with my MSIE5.0 Spanish letters like n-tilde, and even Arabic
and Greek, but I can input only characters available on my rather limited bi-lingual US-English plus Hebrew keyboard.

The fact that someone can read your page does not imply that he/she can 
input characters of the same script. This applies also to all US-ASCII characters. HTML does not require keyboard support even for those.

To make a long story short, accesskey is implementation dependent, and HTML specifications do not require that browsers will support it
(namely support for keyboard input of all Unicode...).

Regards,
Nir Dagan

http://www.nirdagan.com
mailto:nir@nirdagan.com
tel:+972-2-588-3143

"There is nothing quite so practical as a good theory."
-- A. Einstein
Received on Sunday, 9 May 1999 07:52:59 GMT

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