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Re: Dealing with Artistes

From: Kathy Seven Williams <kseven@utah-inter.net>
Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 13:40:06 +0000
Message-Id: <3.0.6.32.19981120134006.00cf4bd0@utah-inter.net>
To: Kynn Bartlett <kynn@idyllmtn.com>, w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
If all blind people were the same and all totally blind this would be a
somewhat-understandable statement. Since we are not. Since many of us have
low vision which can be augmented by magnification and enhancing contrast,
we have a strong appreciation for visual images as do normally sighted
people. I have 6 works of graphic art in my home each done by a different
artist and each a treasure to me.  I was just saying to a professor in my
department at Utah State University that I appreciate his leaving the
thumbnail images of his paintings on his web site even in the text area he
has developed for the visually impaired and those who would want to print
out from the site because I love the opportunity to click on these as I
view with a magnifying glass and be shown a full screen version of th
paintings. While the entire internet is not worth my viewing nose-on-screen
through 48 diopters of glass, some things are and I like having the option. 

>   But I'm an artiste'!  My work is purely graphical and
>   means nothing to someone is blind; they are not the
>   target audience for my gallery of visual artwork, and
>   so I don't need to be concerned with them.
>
>What do you feel is the best response to this -- or are they
>right?

"While they were saying among themselves it cannot be done, it was done."
Helen Keller

K7 (Kathy Seven Williams)
kseven@utah-inter.net
http://home.utah-inter.net/kseven/
Received on Friday, 20 November 1998 15:41:00 GMT

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