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Re: context?

From: Chris Maden <crism@oreilly.com>
Date: Fri, 13 Nov 1998 18:13:52 -0500 (EST)
Message-Id: <199811132313.SAA25795@ruby.ora.com>
To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
[William Loughborough]
> WL:: The reason we have a WAI and its associated interest and
> working groups is because it's not seen as "a piece of cake" by
> either most web authors or the companies that produce authoring
> tools.  To imply (or state directly as the other part of his quote
> did) that these issues can be solved through "voluntary" means
> without "government intervention" is hopelessly naive.  Ted put his
> foot in it and trying to put it in a better light is not helpful.

Your way of looking at it: Web access is seen as hard to provide and
requires enforcement.  Access will only happen where it is enforced.
Conclusion: Successful Web access will require watchdogs monitoring
each and every site, and sufficient enforcement involvement
(presumably the government) to monitor and punish every site.  Where
government funds are insufficient, or the law is inapplicable, access
will not happen.

Ted's way of looking at it: Web access is not hard, or should not be.
Access will only happen where education has reached.  Conclusion:
Successful Web access will require an aggressive education campaign,
but we need not wait for shock troops to be available to begin.

Which is more likely to produce a more accessible Web?

-Chris
-- 
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Received on Friday, 13 November 1998 18:14:29 GMT

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