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RE: Proposed reorganisation of media accessibility [ related to issue 2393]

From: Gregg Vanderheiden <gv@trace.wisc.edu>
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2008 08:55:20 -0600
To: "'Bailey, Bruce'" <Bailey@Access-Board.gov>, w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Message-id: <003401c87ed0$eed08740$5f0b2148@NC84301>
Hi Bruce,

 

It is on the survey.  I think it is the last item.   Might not have been
there when you looked.  Or - (Because it is associated with an issue) you
might not have recognized it.    

 

RE Your questions:

 

"specific sensory experience is defined as 

specific sensory experience

a sensory experience that is not purely decorative and does not primarily
convey important information or perform a function

  Like a melody or pure art.   Think pleasure (or pain or some emotion). 

 

An xray  or sonogram are information..visual information, but information..
Important information.     They would need long descriptions. 

 

Test results would also need to be presented in text to the best ability
according to the guidelines as written.   

 

There is always difficulty in presenting some graphic information in text.
For example a picture of a crime scene.   There could be clues in the
position of anything relative to something else.    

 

Live video-only is not covered in the  guidelines.   There are no
requirements for that in WCAG 2.0.   

 


Gregg
 -- ------------------------------ 
Gregg C Vanderheiden Ph.D. 

 

 


  _____  


From: w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org] On Behalf
Of Bailey, Bruce
Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2008 7:41 AM
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Subject: RE: Proposed reorganisation of media accessibility [ related to
issue 2393]

I do no see this in this week's survey, so I am responding to the list.

 

On the call last week I brought up the following examples (expanded a little
here).  I am a little concerned that the current wording for the success
criteria and definitions do not sufficiently reflect these usage cases.  Per
the call, there seemed to be agreement that these were all situations where
descriptive identification of the non-text content was appropriate.

*	Images that visually reflect extra-sensory experiences (e.g., x-ray,
sonogram, MRI).
*	Test *results* that must be presented visually because that is the
only way we know how to capture the information (e.g., EKG, seismograph,
lie-detector).
*	Live video-only content (e.g., weather or traffic camera, a
self-running game-of-life).

 

I believe there may be further gray areas, for example hand writing,
graffiti, and other text-heavy artwork.

 

My proposal for resolving this is to include each of the above example into
the Understanding document.  We may need to discuss which SC to associate
each with.  We added an SC for live audio-only.  I think we may need an SC
for video-only (recorded or not).  As with the web-cam examples above,
descriptive identification is sometimes enough, but sometimes captioning or
a full transcript would be required.

 


  _____  


From: w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org] On Behalf
Of Gregg Vanderheiden
Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2008 12:53 AM
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Subject: Proposed reorganisation of media accessibility [ related to issue
2393]


 Based on last weeks discussion - a revised reorganization is provided below


 

This version pulls language from TEITAC that makes our provisions read a bit
better.

 

[snip]

 

1.1.1 Non-text Content: All
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20/#non-text-contentdef> non-text content that
is presented to the user has a
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20/#text-altdef> text alternative that
presents equivalent information, except for the situations listed below.
(Level A)
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/20071218/Overview.php#qr-text-equiv-a
ll> How to Meet 1.1.1
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20/WD-UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20-20071218/text-equiv
-all.html> Understanding 1.1.1

*	Controls, Input: If non-text content is a control or accepts user
input, then it has a  <http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20/#namedef> name that
describes its purpose. (See also Guideline 4.1
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20/#ensure-compat> .) 

*         Media: If non-text content is media then text alternatives at
least provide descriptive identification of the non-text content. (See
Guideline 1.2 for additional requirements for media.)

*	Test: If non-text content is a test or exercise that
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20/#must-nontextdef> must be presented in
non-text format, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive
identification of the non-text content. 
*	Sensory: If non-text content is primarily intended to create a
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20/#sensoryexpdef> specific sensory
experience, then text alternatives at least provide descriptive
identification of the non-text content. 
*	 <http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20/#CAPTCHAdef> CAPTCHA: If the
purpose non-text content is to confirm that content is being accessed by a
person rather than a computer, then text alternatives that identify and
describe the purpose of the non-text content are provided, and alternative
forms of CAPTCHA using output modes for different types of sensory
perception are provided to accommodate different disabilities. 
*	Decoration, Formatting, Invisible: If non-text content is
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20/#puredecdef> pure decoration, or used only
for visual formatting, or if it is not presented to users, then non-text
content is implemented in a way that it can be ignored by
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/WCAG20/#atdef> assistive technology. 

 

[snip]
Received on Wednesday, 5 March 2008 14:55:43 GMT

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