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RE: [teitac-websoftware] Color

From: Sean Hayes <Sean.Hayes@microsoft.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Aug 2007 22:46:10 +0100
To: Sailesh Panchang <spanchang02@yahoo.com>
CC: "w3c-wai-gl@w3.org" <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Message-ID: <7261AC2A5F73904CA41773C8F00813FF04ECA2C233@EA-EXMSG-C309.europe.corp.microsoft.com>

Yes I understand the point of the clause. However the wording is incorrect.

Reading out an asterisk or other markup using a screen reader is also relying on sensory characteristics of components, namely their sound. The only way to not rely on some sensory characteristic would be by direct mind transfer.

I'll try and think of a better clause which better captures the intent.

Sean Hayes
Incubation Lab
Accessibility Business Unit
Microsoft


-----Original Message-----
From: Sailesh Panchang [mailto:spanchang02@yahoo.com]
Sent: 21 August 2007 22:38
To: Sean Hayes
Cc: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Subject: RE: [teitac-websoftware] Color

> You can't read without sensing the size shape and
>location of  letters.
That is not the point. The size, color, shape is
pointless to A person who cannot see. A screen reader
will read out the text  regardless of its color and
other attributes.
Hence it is a problem when one reads "fields  in red
are mandatory on the form". One can read the
instruction and the form field labels but may not be
able to tell the color difference.
An asterisk or a word "required"  within the label
with a suitable instruction conveys the point.
With regard to information v/s differences:
Sure we are talking about information conveyed by
color.
And information refers not only to semantics or
meaning but also structure.
But it is the variation in color  which is the key
that distinguishes some content from  some other
content.
It is alright to do this too to reinforce the point
for the benefit of sighted users.
But it should be accompanied by suitable markup too so
that it is evident to one who cannot see.
eg. Sometimes grouping of data is conveyed visually by
color differences. The groups need to be marked up
suitably- headers, lists etc. may be an alternative.
Sailesh Panchang
www.deque.com

--- Sean Hayes <Sean.Hayes@microsoft.com> wrote:

> Warning this entire message is to be ignored if
> presented in Blue text.
>
> Under the proposed wording this message is legal; as
> it has no color differences (except for the obvious
> requirement that to have a color contrast there must
> be a difference between foreground and background).
> There is however a color coding going on here. So it
> is not the word 'difference' that is operational,
> bit the word 'information'.
>
> (NB for those of you unable to see it, this message
> is encoded in a single color, but I'm not going to
> tell you which one as that would spoil the point of
> the exercise ).
>
>
>
> Sean Hayes
> Incubation Lab
> Accessibility Business Unit
> Microsoft
>
>
>




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Received on Tuesday, 21 August 2007 21:46:35 GMT

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