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Issue # 1142 - Older persons should be included in addition to the disabled

From: Andi Snow-Weaver <andisnow@us.ibm.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 15:49:45 -0600
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Message-ID: <OF29CE9A1D.D54E2556-ON86256F66.00602259-86256F66.0077E95C@us.ibm.com>

I have an old work item to propose some wording that would include older
persons in the "User needs" section of the Overview.

Current wording:

User needs

Here are a few scenarios, by no means an exhaustive list of the variations
and types of disabilities and needs:

Someone who cannot hear well will want a visual representation of
information presented via sound.

Someone who cannot see well will want to hear or feel (via braille or
tactile graphics) an equivalent of the visual information.

Someone who does not have the strength to move quickly or easily will want
to use as little movement as possible and have as much time as they need
when operating Web interfaces.

Someone who does not read well may want to hear the information read aloud.

If Web content employs the design principles described in this document,
then users should be able to access the content using adaptive strategies
and assistive technologies. There are many tools that people with
disabilities employ to make use of Web content. For more in-depth scenarios
of people with disabilities using accessible and inaccessible Web content,
please read "How People with Disabilities Use the Web".

Proposed wording:

User needs

Here are a few scenarios, by no means an exhaustive list of the variations
and types of disabilities and needs:

Someone who cannot hear well will want a visual representation of
information presented via sound.

Someone who cannot see well will want to hear or feel (via braille or
tactile graphics) an equivalent of the visual information.

Someone who does not have the strength to move quickly or easily will want
to use as little movement as possible and have as much time as they need
when operating Web interfaces.

Someone who does not read well may want to hear the information read aloud.

If Web content employs the design principles described in this document,
then users with disabilities and those who, because of aging, are
experiencing reduced vision, hearing, or motor control should be able to
access the content using adaptive strategies and assistive technologies.
There are many tools that people with disabilities employ to make use of
Web content. For more in-depth scenarios of people with disabilities using
accessible and inaccessible Web content, please read "How People with
Disabilities Use the Web".


Andi
andisnow@us.ibm.com
IBM Accessibility Center
(512) 838-9903, http://www.ibm.com/able
Internal Tie Line 678-9903, http://w3.austin.ibm.com/~snsinfo
Received on Friday, 10 December 2004 21:50:45 GMT

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