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RE: diacritic marks

From: Richard Ishida <ishida@w3.org>
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2004 15:43:34 -0000
To: "'lisa seeman'" <seeman@netvision.net.il>, "'W3c-Wai-Gl@W3.Org'" <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Message-ID: <003e01c3ea6c$7b97f670$cd01000a@w3cishida>

Lisa,

When you say "taken a n action item to document what words need what
diacritic marks in Hebrew to fulfill the criteria", do you mean that this
will only apply to certain words? Seems it would be a tall order to list all
such words.

When you say, "removable at the users request", do you mean that a browser
would have a switch to display/hide such diacritics?  How do you see that
happening?

Cheers,
RI


-----Original Message-----
From: w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org] On Behalf
Of lisa seeman
Sent: 03 February 2004 06:22
To: W3c-Wai-Gl@W3.Org
Subject: diacritic marks



Hi Folks,

diacritic marks - conclusions from ISOC IL

We are happy with the current wording and prioritization of the success
criteria. :)

 We would like however to suggest adding a level three criteria that seas
the all diacritic marks necessary for pronunciation should be provided, and
should be removable at the users request. 

ISOC IL have also taken a n action item to document what words need what
diacritic marks in Hebrew to fulfill the criteria.

Background
Some languages use diacritic marks to give the pronunciation of a word. In
some languages (like Hebrew and Arabic) most spellings, without diacritic
marks, can be resolved to more then one word. Use of context enables the
average reader to work out what word was intended. 

 Natural language processing used in screen readers can often guess what
word is intended without diacritic marks. However all screen readers will
often make mistakes.

<snip/>
Received on Tuesday, 3 February 2004 10:43:50 UTC

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