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RE: Action item: new examples for Guideline 3.1

From: John M Slatin <john_slatin@austin.utexas.edu>
Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 13:58:01 -0500
Message-ID: <C46A1118E0262B47BD5C202DA2490D1A0183AFE6@MAIL02.austin.utexas.edu>
To: "Roberto Scano - IWA/HWG" <rscano@iwa-italy.org>, <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>

Thanks, Roberto!

I agree that "W3C" is more accurately described as an abbreviation than
an acronym.  And thanks for aligning my first example with the material
on content negotiation and user agents.

John



"Good design is accessible design." 
Please note our new name and URL!
John Slatin, Ph.D.
Director, Accessibility Institute
University of Texas at Austin
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ph 512-495-4288, f 512-495-4524
email jslatin@mail.utexas.edu
web http://www.utexas.edu/research/accessibility/


 



-----Original Message-----
From: Roberto Scano - IWA/HWG [mailto:rscano@iwa-italy.org] 
Sent: Wednesday, May 12, 2004 1:49 pm
To: John M Slatin; w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Subject: Re: Action item: new examples for Guideline 3.1



----- Original Message ----- 
From: "John M Slatin" <john_slatin@austin.utexas.edu>
To: <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Sent: Wednesday, May 12, 2004 8:35 PM
Subject: Action item: new examples for Guideline 3.1


<proposed>

Example 1. A document that exists in English, French, and German
versions.

A corporate Web server identifies the country where a user's IP address
is located. It displays the site in the appropriate language.  A user's
screen reader automatically uses the appropriate pronunciation rules,
based on the presence of a language-identifier in the document.

</proposed>


---
Roberto Scano:
I suggest a rewording of this... because usually (also following WCAG
1.0 techniques for checkpoint 11.3:
http://www.w3.org/TR/WAI-WEBCONTENT-TECHS/#tech-content-preferences).
This is "content negotiation" that must be done following the user
preferences for the user agent. Eg: an american that use internet
connection in an hotel in Venice, the IP is italian and - if we follow
this example - the page will be show in italian. I propose this
rewording:

<proposed>

Example 1. A document that exists in English, French, and German
versions.

A corporate Web server identifies the language set by the user in the
user agent preferences. It displays the site in the appropriate
language.  A user's screen reader automatically uses the appropriate
pronunciation rules, based on the presence of a language-identifier in
the document.

</proposed>


---
John M Slatin:

<proposed>

*        Example 2: an acronym.

The characters "W3C" are marked as an acronym the first time they appear
on a Web page. A person using a screen reader would hear, "World Wide
Web Consortium.";  Later in the document, the user hears the characters
"W 3 C" spoken one at a time, because they are not marked as an acronym.

</proposed>

---
Roberto Scano:
In a lot of W3C Reccomandation, like ATAG 1.0, the conformance claim
declare W3C as an abbreviation, not acronym: <abbr title="the World Wide
Web Consortium">W3C</abbr>. I Suggest to change this example with one
like these: http://www.acronymsearch.com/FAQ_001.htm


These two eurocents for now ;-)
Received on Wednesday, 12 May 2004 15:16:46 GMT

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