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PLAIN: Proposed rewording for Principle 1, Guideline 1.1, plus success criteria, examp

From: John M Slatin <john_slatin@austin.utexas.edu>
Date: Mon, 3 Nov 2003 17:04:34 -0600
Message-ID: <C46A1118E0262B47BD5C202DA2490D1A1E2FF9@MAIL02.austin.utexas.edu>
To: <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
This message contains a series of proposals for a "plain language_
rewording of WCAG 2.0 Guideline 1 and Checkpoint 1.1 with Success
Criteria, Examples, and Benefits

 

I send it to the list in partial fulfillment of an action item taken by
John Slatin, Katie Haritos-Shay, and Doyle Burnett during a call in late
September or early October, to generate a plain-language version of WCAG
2.0.  

 

What follows is partial in two ways: (1) It addresses only Guideline
(now Principle) 1, Checkpoint (now Guideline) 1.1, and the relevant
success criteria, examples, and benefits.  Other guidelines, etc., will
follow.  (2) It is not really "plain language," in the sense that this
text has not yet been compared to the 1500-word "special lexicon" used
by Voice of America (or other similar lexicons).  Thus it's actually
best understood as an attempt to simplify and clarify.  We're still
working on the formal plain language issues, but wanted to put this out
to start generating discussion.  I should also acknowledge that there
are a couple of places where I've taken some editorial liberties
(couldn't help myself), and that this material hasn't yet been through
the round-robin editing process that Katie and Doyle and I agreed upon,
so all the errors that they'd have caught are still here.

 

Items labeled "Current wording" are taken from the September document
Reorg 4, available at http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/2003/09/reorg4.html
<http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/2003/09/reorg4.html> .  This document was
current at the time Katie and Doyle and I took on the action item to
attempt a plain language version.  Of course the proposed rewordings
will need to be correlated with later updates.

 

 


Current wording for Guideline 1


Guideline 1: PERCEIVABLE. Make Content Perceivable by Any User

 


Proposed wording for Principle 1


Principle 1: PERCEIVABLE. All users should be able to perceive all
content.

 


Current wording for Checkpoint 1.1


All non-text content that can be expressed in words has a text
equivalent of the function or information that the non-text content was
intended to convey.


Proposed wording for Guideline 1.1


For non-text content, provide text equivalents that serve the same
purpose or convey the same information as the non-text content, except
when the purpose of the non-text content is to create a specific sensory
experience (for example, music, visual art) in which case a text label
and description are sufficient. 


Current wording for success criteria (SC) for Checkpoint 1.1


Current wording for SC 1


1. non-text content that can be

expressed in words

has a

text-equivalent

explicitly associated with it.


Proposed wording for SC 1


Text equivalents are explicitly associated with non-text content, except
when the non-text content is intended to create a specific sensory
experience (for example, music without words, visual art).


Current wording for bullet under SC 1


* The text equivalent fulfills the same function as the author intended
for the non-text content (i.e. it presents all of the intended
information and/or

achieves the same function of the non-text content).


Proposed wording for bullet under SC 1


* The text equivalent fulfills the same function as the author intended
for the non-text content (that is, it conveys all of the intended
information and achieves the same function as the non-text content).


Current wording for Checkpoint 1.1, SC 2


2. non-text content

that can not be

expressed in words

has a descriptive label provided as its text-equivalent.


Proposed wording for Guideline 1.1, SC 2


2. non-text content that is designed to create a specific sensory
experience (such as music without words or visual art) 

has a text label and a text description.


Current wording for Best Practice Measures for Checkpoint 1.1


1. non-text content that can not be expressed in words has a text
equivalent for all aspects that can be expressed in words.

2. a text document that merges all audio descriptions and

captions

into a

collated script

(that provides dialog, important sounds and important visual information
in a single text document) is provided.

list end


Proposed wording for Best Practice Measures for Checkpoint 


1.1


1. Deleted for consistency with changes to 1.1 that eliminate the phrase
"expressed in words"

2. a single text document is provided that merges transcripts of all
audio descriptions and captions into a collated transcript that includes
all important visual information, all dialogue, and other important
sounds,.

 


Current wording for Benefits of Checkpoint 1.1


* Individuals who are blind, have low vision, have cognitive
disabilities or have trouble reading text for any reason can have the
text read aloud to them.

* Individuals who are deaf, are hard of hearing or who are having
trouble understanding the audio information for any reason can read the
text presentation

* Individuals who are blind or deaf-blind can have the information
presented in braille.


Proposed wording for Who Benefits from Guideline 1.1


* People who are blind, have low vision, have cognitive disabilities or
have trouble reading text for any reason can have the text read aloud to
them by assistive technology.

* People who are deaf or hard of hearing, or who are having trouble
understanding audio information for any reason can read the

text presentation or have it translated and presented as sign language
by assistive technology.

* People who are blind or deaf-blind can read the text in braille.


Current wording for Examples of Checkpoint 1.1


Current wording for example 1


* Example 1: an image used as a button. (short description of function)

A right arrow icon is used to link to the next slide in a slide show.
The text equivalent is "Next Slide," so that what is read by a screen
reader would

be "link: Next Slide."


Proposed wording for Example 1


* Example 1: an image used as a button. (short equivalent for function)

 

A right arrow icon is used to link to the next slide in a slide show.
The text equivalent is "Next Slide," so that a screen reader wouldread
the phrase "Next Slide" and automatically identify it as a link by
adding the word link or changing the synthesizer's voice.


Current wording for example 2


* Example 2: a data chart. (short label + longer description)

 

A bar chart compares how many widgets were sold in June, July, and
August. The short label says, "Figure one - Sales in June, July and
August." The longer

description identifies the type of chart or graph, provides a high-level
summary of the data comparable to that available from the chart or
graph, and

lists the data themselves.


Proposed wording for example 2


* Example 2: a data chart. (short label + longer description)

 

A bar chart compares how many widgets were sold in June, July, and
August. The short label says, "Figure one - Sales in June, July and
August." The longer description identifies the type of chart or graph,
provides a high-level summary of the data comparable to that available
from the chart or graph, and provides the data themselves in a table or
other accessible format. 

 


Current wording for example 3


* Example 3: an animation. (short label + longer description)

 

An animation shows how to tie a knot. The short label says, "An
animation showing how to tie a square knot." The longer explanation
describes the hand movements

needed to tie the knot.


Proposed wording for example 3


No change

 


Current wording for example 4


* Example 4: an audio file of a speech. (short label + transcript)

 

An audio file is embedded in a Web page. The short label says,
"Chairman's speech to the assembly." A link to a text transcript is
provided immediately

after the clip.


Proposed wording for example 4


* Example 4: an audio file of a speech. (short label + transcript)

 

An audio file is embedded in a Web page. The short label says,
"Chairman's speech to the assembly." A link to a text transcript is
provided immediately after the audio clip.

 


Current wording for example 5


* Example 5: an audio file of a symphony. (short label)

 

An audio file is embedded in a Web page. The short label says,
"Beethoven's 5th Symphony performed by the Vienna Philharmonic
Orchestra."


Proposed wording for example 5


No change. But as currently worded, this example is no longer consistent
with the Guideline's requirement to provide a text label and
description.

 

 

 


"Good design is accessible design." 
Please note our new name and URL!
John Slatin, Ph.D.
Director, Accessibility Institute
University of Texas at Austin
FAC 248C
1 University Station G9600
Austin, TX 78712
ph 512-495-4288, f 512-495-4524
email jslatin@mail.utexas.edu
web http://www.utexas.edu/research/accessibility/
<http://www.utexas.edu/research/accessibility/> 


 

 
Received on Monday, 3 November 2003 18:04:35 GMT

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