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Re: [TECH] Colour Difference Algorithm

From: Joe Clark <joeclark@joeclark.org>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2003 13:22:01 -0400 (EDT)
To: WAI-GL <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Message-ID: <Pine.BSO.4.53.0309021314340.14341@mail.veldt.ca>

A very good summary from Wendy, proving it was easy to summarize all
along.

I am beavering away on a brief for the Working Group f2f next week that
will put all this together. Since Wendy has quoted it, though, I can
certain recommend the Brewer Palette as a set of colours that nearly
everyone can distinguish and whose names nearly everyone agrees on. I'll
be advancing the Brewer Palette as an option for designers who don't want
to worry about things and just want to pick a set of colours that is known
to work.

> "If, however, you wish to maximally avoid colour confusions, you have a
> range of colour choices at your disposal.

--i.e., the Brewer Palette, named after Cindy Brewer.

<http://joeclark.org/book/sashay/serialization/Chapter09.html#h2-1515>


Also, let's not forget the utility of user stylesheets, though it seems no
one on the CSS Working Group ever imagined that people would want to remap
colours according to a formula rather than to a specific named colour.
Failing that, authors can provide a stylesheet-switcher, which are proven
to be so easy that individual blog authors have them. (I'm compiling a
list.)

--

  Joe Clark  |  joeclark@joeclark.org
  Author, _Building Accessible Websites_
  <http://joeclark.org/access/> | <http://joeclark.org/book/>
Received on Tuesday, 2 September 2003 13:24:22 GMT

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