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Checkpoint 2.1 (revisions from Jan 16 Telecon)

From: Ben Caldwell <caldwell@trace.wisc.edu>
Date: Thu, 6 Feb 2003 11:55:57 -0600
To: "'WCAG List'" <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Message-ID: <008901c2ce09$00ae84e0$9017a8c0@ippiii7501>

At the January 16 Telecon, the editors took an action item to redraft
Checkpoint 2.1 according to the discussion (minutes at
http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/2003/01/16-minutes.html). I've pasted a copy of
the checkpoint with the revisions included below for inclusion in the
next draft.

List of changes:

1) Reworded checkpoint text
2) Reworded minimum level success criterion to match checkpoint text
3) Removed the level 2 criterion
4) Added a third benefit per Wendy's proposal (Proposal #1 at   
   http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-gl/2003JanMar/0046.html)

---------------------------

Checkpoint 2.1 Ensure that all of the functionality is operable at a 
minimum through a keyboard or other character input device. 

Success criteria
You will have successfully met Checkpoint 2.1 at the Minimum Level if:
    1. all of the functionality of the content is operable at a minimum 
        through a keyboard or other character input device. 
          + Note: refer to checkpoint 5.3 for information regarding user
            agent support.

You will have successfully met Checkpoint 2.1 at Level 2 if:
    * (presently no additional criteria for this level.)

You will have successfully met Checkpoint 2.1 at Level 3 if:
     * (presently no additional criteria for this level.)

The following are additional ideas for enhancing a site along this
particular dimension:
     * (presently no additional criteria for this level.)

Definitions (informative)
   Character input is defined as those characters that can be mapped to
   the character set of the W3C Character Model (which is based on
   Unicode).

Benefits (informative)
     * Individuals who are blind (and cannot use pointing devices) can
       have access to the functionality of the Web content or site.
     * Individuals with severe physical disabilities can use speech
input
       (which simulates keystrokes) to both enter data and operate the
       interface elements on the page.
     * Individuals who are physically disabled and cannot use pointing 
       devices or speech input can have access to the functionality of 
       the Web content.

Examples (informative)
     * Example 1: operation with multiple input devices.
       The content relies only on focus-in, focus-out, and activation
       events; these are defined in the API of the environment for which
       the content is written, and are intended to be operable by a
       variety of input devices, including pointing devices, keyboards
       and speech input systems.


--
Ben Caldwell | caldwell@trace.wisc.edu
Trace Research and Development Center (http://trace.wisc.edu)   
Received on Thursday, 6 February 2003 12:58:52 GMT

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