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RE: [w3c-wai-gl] <none>

From: Gregg Vanderheiden <gv@trace.wisc.edu>
Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 10:14:56 -0600
To: "'Roberto Scano - IWA/HWG'" <rscano@iwa-italy.org>, w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Message-id: <005801c2c7b1$90dda9a0$ac17a8c0@TOSHIBATABLET>
Hmmmm

 

How to say this ....

 

There is inaccessible CSS but there is not accessible CSS.   That is, CSS
isn't a means to convey content but a tool that would be used with a content
technology. 

 

There could be CSS items that would be used with HTML for example.    Then
you could have an HTML techniques doc and an HTML + CSS techniques doc.
But you couldn't have a CSS doc by itself.   There would be no way to
describe how to meet all the guidelines.   

 

And if our techniques docs are to contain our checklists -- then we have to
address all the success critieria.    I think it would be very dangerous to
start having checklists where you can check all the checkboxes and still not
address all the Level 1 issues.  It will lead to a lot of false positive
assessments.

 

So lets think about a CSS techniques source file (that can be used to build
an "HTML with CSS Techniques" doc.  

 

 

 

Gregg

 

 -- ------------------------------ 

Gregg C Vanderheiden Ph.D. 

Professor - Ind. Engr. & BioMed Engr.

Director - Trace R & D Center 

University of Wisconsin-Madison 

 

 

 

 

Gregg:

ISSUE #5

This seems to imply that there will be an HTML techniques doc and a CSS
techniques doc.  Since the checklists are derived from (and contained in)
techniques docs,  this would imply that there is a CSS techniques doc with
checklist items in it - but not checklist items for all of the success

criteria (at each or any level) .    I don't believe we can have a CSS

checklist (and therefore should not have a CSS techniques doc).  CSS is part
of HTML just like GIF, and JPEG etc. It should not be thought of as separate
since you cannot make it accessible.

 

 

Roberto:

i don't agree with this...

CSS is a different W3C Raccomandation and is possible to have css that are
not accessible and CSS that are accessible. For ex, this code:

 

h1 {

 font-family: Georgia, Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;

 font-size: 16px;

 font-weight: bold;

 color: #000;

 text-align: center;

 background-color: #fff;

}

 

 

h2 {

 font-family: Georgia, Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;

 font-size: 0.8em;

 font-weight: bold;

 color: #000;

 text-align: center;

 background-color: #fff;

}

 

"h1" is not accessible because the font size is fixed in pixel instead to
"h2" that has the font size in %. I could agree to insert in HTML guidelines
if you think only about in-code CSS but we need to make a specific checklist
for CSS.

 

 
Received on Wednesday, 29 January 2003 11:15:21 GMT

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