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RE: Time Bounds - Universal and User-Specific

From: Gregg Vanderheiden <GV@TRACE.WISC.EDU>
Date: Wed, 21 Nov 2001 01:02:26 -0600
To: "GLWAI Guidelines WG \(GL - WAI Guidelines WG\)" <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Message-ID: <003901c1725a$7a0733c0$066fa8c0@750>
How about something like


Checkpoint 2.4 Either give users control over how long they can interact
with content that requires a timed response or give them as much time as
possible unless the event is realtime based.


Success criteria
You will have successfully either given users control over how long they
can interact with content that requires a timed response or given them
as much time as possible if:

- the user is allowed to deactivate automatic timeouts or updating or
- the user is allowed to set the timeout to 10 times the default timeout
period or
- the user is warned before time expires and given at least 10 seconds
to extend the time available to them or
- the user is allowed to set how often the content is updated (in
seconds) or
- the user is given as much time as possible or
- the event is a realtime event (such as an auction which closes at
5:00pm).
And
- any moving text can be frozen by the user.


This set of choices should cover the different types of timed events I
am aware of.
My clinical experience has shown that 10 seconds is long enough to
capture most users -- though some will always have problems with any
timed task if they know it is timed.

Gregg



-- ------------------------------
Gregg C Vanderheiden Ph.D.
Professor - Human Factors
Dept of Ind. Engr. - U of Wis.
Director - Trace R & D Center
Gv@trace.wisc.edu <mailto:Gv@trace.wisc.edu>, <http://trace.wisc.edu/>
FAX 608/262-8848 
For a list of our listserves send “lists” to listproc@trace.wisc.edu
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Received on Wednesday, 21 November 2001 02:02:54 GMT

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